Folklore aka FolksSoul (2007, Game, PS3) – 7/10 review

Executive Director: Yoshiki Okamoto
Director: Takashi Shono
Lisa Hogg: English: Ellen
Richard Coyle: English: Keats

Folklore aka FolksSoul (2007)

Ellen receives a mysterious letter from her deceased mother asking her to come to the Cliff of Sidhe in Doolin. When she arrives, a woman, presumably her mother, hurls herself off the cliff-top leaving an aghast Ellen and reporter on the supernatural Keats, who was also there, to try and discover why she would do such a thing. Together they discover that Doolin is an entrance to the Netherworld and that Ellen’s lost memories are within.

7/10

This is an eye-massagingly gorgeous game that is generous with its delights but which nearly undoes all the wonderfulness with an interminable fun-sapping trudge through the appropriately entitled Endless Corridor as it is possible to go around in circles in there forever. Outside of that misjudgement, Folklore features an abundance of riches with an interesting combat system (you use captured enemies as your own elemental weapons and the boss battles are great), scores of wonderful creatures, stunning environments and, arguably, the only completely successful integration of Sixaxis motion controls in any PS3 game. There is a surprisingly captivating story (what happened to Herve? SPOILER he is terminally ill and gives his blood, and life, to save our heroine but she only remembers that he died and it was her fault and presumes she murdered him) and some intriguing existential musings (death is a motivation for material and spiritual achievement; our concept of the afterworld is created by our own life experiences). Special mention for the steps that giggle with infectious delight at the Faery Lord’s Hall and the musical pavement at the Cloak Hall and it is precisely this kind of joyous, beautiful touch that I will remember Folklore for.

Classified 12+ by PEGI. The game is only suitable for persons who have reached the age of 12 or over.
Classified Violence by PEGI. Game contains depictions of violence.

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