Dragon Age: Origins – Awakening (2010) – fantasy action role-playing game sequel DLC review

Cast / crew
Producer: Fernando Melo
Lead Designer: Ferret Baudoin
Project Manager: Adriana Lopez
Lead Programmer: Owen Borstad
Quality Assurance Lead: Jason Leong
Greg Ellis: Anders
Adam Leadbeater: Justice
Simon Chadwick: Nathaniel Howe
Steven J. Blum: Oghren
Natalia Cigliuti: Sigrun
Jamie Glover: The Architect
Dee Dee Rescher: The Mother
Robin Sachs: Varel
Grey Delisle: Velanna

Dragon Age: Origins Awakenings (2010)

With the Blight over and the Archdemon slain, it comes as a great surprise when you arrive in your new arlship and the new Ferelden Grey Warden Headquarters Vigil’s Keep, previously under the governance of Rendon Howe, and find devastation wrought by darkspawn under the leadership of one that can talk, reason and lead.

9/10

Perhaps it’s because it didn’t need the slow introduction of the main game but this supremely entertaining sequel to Dragon Age: Origins starts at full pace and doesn’t let up giving you lots of little quests to keep you busy, interspersed with the occasional impossible decision, peppered with a lot of funny, fun dialogue. It even has a secret room, at last!

This Dragon Age: Origins game contains mild swear words and strong, gory violence with an hilarious option to leave you peppered with gravity resistant blood splatters that are way too big, unpleasant scenes and non-sexual nudity.

Links

This blog is a participant in the Amazon EU Associates Programme, an affiliate advertising programme designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.co.uk.

Advertisements

Dragon Age: Origins – Witch Hunt (2010) – fantasy action role-playing game DLC review

Cast / crew
Lead Designer: Ferret Baudoin
Technical Designer: Mark Barazzuol
Technical Designer: Jason Hill
Technical Designer: Kaelin Lavallee
Technical Designer: David Sims
Cinematic Designer: Ryan Ebenger
Cinematic Designer: Michelle Pettit-Mee
Writer: Sheryl Chee
Writer: David Gaider
Writer: Jennifer Brandes Hepler
Lead Producer: Fernando Melo
Producer: Heather Rabatich

Dragon Age: Origins Witch Hunt (2010)

Morrigan left following the Archdemon’s defeat (just like she said she would) but after hearing reports of a witch matching her description leaving her mark on various communities across Ferelden, the Warden seeks to catch up with her and find out if she needs help… or stopping.

6/10

It’s enough; a bite-size DLC with a couple of new characters, a couple of hours of gameplay and a couple of moments with Morrigan. The climax is a bit weak with a big boss battle as a combat high contrasting poorly with the unsatisfying conversation with Morrigan. Perhaps it was in character for her to keep her cards close to her ample chest but it doesn’t make for a great punctuation point for the conclusion of a DLC. Still, glad to be back in Ferelden.

This Dragon Age: Origins game contains mild swear words and strong, gory violence with an hilarious option to leave you peppered with gravity resistant blood splatters that are way too big.

Links

This blog is a participant in the Amazon EU Associates Programme, an affiliate advertising programme designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.co.uk.

Dragon Age: Origins – The Golems of Amgarrak (2010) – fantasy action role-playing game DLC review

Cast / crew
Lead Designer: Ferret Baudoin
Technical Designer: Mark Barazzuol
Technical Designer: Craig Graff
Technical Designer: David Sitar
Cinematic Designer: Jonathan Epp
Writer: Sheryl Chee
John Ullyatt: Brogan
Adam Howden: Darion
Brian Bloom: Jerrik

Dragon Age: Origins Golems of Amgarrak, The (2010)

The Warden comes to the assistance of Jerrik Dace and helps him search for his brother, presumed lost, after an expedition in to the Deep Roads to recover the secrets of golem construction.

5/10

Despite an impressively gross boss, I didn’t think this was much fun. I suspect this is because it doesn’t feature any of your companions from the main game. It also irritates me when principal characters don’t have to accept when a relative is dead and insist they can keep living if the heroes refuse to believe it; as if it’s largely a being’s will that keeps them alive. It demeans and undermines the entire concept of death.

This Dragon Age: Origins game contains mild swear words and strong, gory violence with an hilarious option to leave you peppered with gravity resistant blood splatters that are way too big.

Links

This blog is a participant in the Amazon EU Associates Programme, an affiliate advertising programme designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.co.uk.

Dragon Age: Origins – Leliana’s Song (2010) – 7/10 fantasy action role-playing game DLC review

Cast / crew
Cinematic Designer: Ryan Ebenger
Cinematic Designer: Jonathan Epp
Cinematic Designer: Michelle Pettit-Mee
Technical Designer: Cori May
Technical Designer: Keith Warner
Writer: Lukas Kristjanson
Lead Producer: Fernando Melo
Producer: Rob Bartel
Producer: Dan Lazin
Corinne Kempa: Leliana
Kath Soucie: Marjolaine
Adam Howden: Silas
John Ullyatt: Sketch
Mark Meer: Tug

Dragon Age: Origins Leliana’s Song (2010)

What was Leliana up to before she entered the Chantry and met the Warden? Well, she was a naughty girl.

7/10

Prequel to Dragon Age: Origins. Fun opening quests; before fleshing out the details we learned during her personal quest in the main game. Story doesn’t quite match up with Leliana’s recounting in Origins but we do get an interesting look into the Mother of the Chantry (who was seduced by Marjolaine) and the switch between Leliana having fun and then getting betrayed is interesting and well done. The dialogue more frequently doesn’t seem to follow on from itself. The ending isn’t exactly satisfying (there isn’t one exactly; Leliana says she won’t tell us what happened between her and Marjolaine) and the difficulty spike for the final boss is rather extreme.

Links

This blog is a participant in the Amazon EU Associates Programme, an affiliate advertising programme designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.co.uk.

Dragon Age: Origins – The Darkspawn Chronicles (2010) – 8/10 fantasy action role-playing game alternate history DLC review

Cast / crew
Lead Designer: Rob Bartel
Lead Writer: Rob Bartel
Technical Designer: Mark Barazzuol
Technical Designer: David Sitar
Technical Designer: Josh Stiksma
Cinematic Designer: Jonathan Epp
Lead Audio Designer: Matt Besler
Audio Designer: Terry Fairfield
Lead Producer: Fernando Melo
Producer: Dan Lazin

Dragon Age: Origins Darkspawn Chronicles, The (2010)

Alternate history DLC. One Grey Warden remains, one threat to the Archdemon: the King of Ferelden, Alistair. He has gathered allies and armies but the Archdemon has endless hordes of Darkspawn at her disposal and has got herself a Hurlock Vanguard (the player) to slay the heroes and ensure darkness triumphs.

8/10

Though it’s not at all obvious that this takes place in an alternate history where your would-be Grey Warden died in the initial joining ceremony and Alistair became the Warden-King who led Ferelden into battle against the Darkspawn, this is a fun expansion with something of a studio tour feel. Look there’s Arl Howe! Look there’s Ohgren! Ooh, there’s Leliana! No way, it’s Morrigan! Though a studio tour where you’re equipped with a hulking great sword and then proceed to mow down all the stars. Terrific fun.

This Dragon Age: Origins game contains strong, gory violence with an hilarious option to leave you peppered with gravity resistant blood splatters that are way too big.

Links

This blog is a participant in the Amazon EU Associates Programme, an affiliate advertising programme designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.co.uk.

Dragon Age: Origins (2009) – 8/10 fantasy action role-playing game review

Cast / crew
Executive Producer: Dan Tudge
Project Director: Dan Tudge
Executive Producer: Mark Darrah
Project Director: Mark Darrah
Lead Designer: Brent Knowles
Lead Designer: Mike Laidlaw
Lead Designer: James Ohlen
Art Director: Dean Andersen
Lead Programmer: Ross Gardner
Voice Over Producer and Director: Caroline Livingstone
Producer: Derek French
Producer: Vanessa Kade
Producer: Kevin Loh
Producer: Kyle Scott
Engine Architect: Derek Beland
Engine Architect: Paul Roffel
Peter Renaday: Duncan
Kate Mulgrew: Flemeth
Tim Curry: Arl Howe
Corinne Kempa: Leliana
Simon Templeman: Loghain
Claudia Black: Morrigan
Steven J. Blum: Oghren
Mark Hildreth: Sten
Susan Boyd Joyce: Wynne
Jon Curry: Zevran

Dragon Age: Origins (2009)

The Land of Ferelden, home to humans, elves and dwarves, is under attack by a Darkspawn horde invigorated by the discovery and release of an Archdemon. As the Grey Wardens prepare to do their duty and lead Ferelden’s army into battle – for only they can slay an Archdemon – the treacherous Teryn Loghain is about to seize this opportunity to take control of the country.

8/10

This turns out to be a great game thanks to the sheer weight of fun, interesting, intriguing and surprising gameplay and story that follows an uninvolving start – something typical of the genre. Story writers for games just refuse to learn that the player will not have an emotional attachment just because you tell them a character is your mother or father. So you aren’t bothered when they’re killed. Later on, after spending fifty hours with other characters, you are bothered when they leave you to become a wandering drunk, you stubborn, stupid entirely understandable fool. While there’s no sense that the world carries on without you and characters with their clothes off look bizarre, the game (on PC) looks terrific, quests frequently feature interesting decisions, the generous spots of humour show welcome humanity, and the rewarding combat is as simple or tactical as you want it (and can be altered during gameplay at any time without penalty, thank you). Though it should have just been called Dragon Age. What is it with Americans and their subtitles? They sure love them some colons.

This game contains bad language, adult dialogue and strong, gory violence with an hilarious option to leave you peppered with gravity resistant blood splatters that are way too big and sex scenes.

Classified 18+ by PEGI. The game is only suitable for adults who have reached the age of 18 or over..

Links

This blog is a participant in the Amazon EU Associates Programme, an affiliate advertising programme designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.co.uk.