Sherlock 1.03 The Great Game (2010, Crime Detective Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Benedict Cumberbatch: Sherlock Holmes
Martin Freeman: Dr. John Watson
Writer: Mark Gatiss
Co-Creator: Steven Moffat
Writer (Original Works): Arthur Conan Doyle
Producer: Sue Vertue
Director: Paul McGuigan
Actor (uncredited) Mycroft Holmes: Mark Gatiss
Executive Producer: Mark Gatiss
Executive Producer: Steven Moffat

Sherlock 1.03 Great Game, The (2010)

A bored Sherlock is bemoaning the lack of crime but the spark soon comes back when he is forced to solve five crimes against the ticking clock of a bomb around innocent persons bodies.

7/10

While there’s a nagging feeling that it isn’t achieving it’s potential, this is unquestionably the best new show on British television in 2010 and for some time. There’s a glee and energy to proceedings and the deductions from Sherlock are terrific fun. It would be nice if the audience were given the same clues as Sherlock (we still wouldn’t see them, of course) and I still feel that all this Moriarty business is too soon. It’s like end-of-the-world scenarios in Doctor Who. If every episode is Armageddon, it becomes the norm; the ordinary when it should be the extraordinary. For Sherlock, if everything runs through Moriarty’s fingers, it makes Moriarty’s involvement the norm; the ordinary when it should be the extraordinary.

This Sherlock episode contains a muffled mild swear word and violence, unpleasant scenes.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

Sherlock 1.02 The Blind Banker (2010, Crime Detective Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Benedict Cumberbatch: Sherlock Holmes
Martin Freeman: Dr. John Watson
Creator: Mark Gatiss
Creator: Steven Moffat
Writer: Steve Thompson
Writer (Original Works): Arthur Conan Doyle
Producer: Sue Vertue
Director: Euros Lyn
Executive Producer: Mark Gatiss
Executive Producer: Steven Moffat

Sherlock 1.02 Blind Banker, The (2010)

Shortly after being terrified by a graffiti symbol, people in locked rooms are dying sudden mysterious deaths.

6/10

Successfully giving Watson more to do and allowing Holmes to be occasionally undermined by his own self-centred arrogance are highlights in an episode (loosely based on The Adventure of the Dancing Men) that is rather less successful in disguising an abundance of deus ex machina. So Sherlock can come to the rescue at a secret gang hideout based on the word "tramway" while manipulating time and space to arrive barely minutes after the baddies ; a damp Yellow Pages, a really cool clue in itself, connects a Chinese woman to his current case except it doesn’t; and people react with horror to a cipher message that they haven’t yet decoded. The Moriarty coda is, again, awful and so unnecessary. However, the identity of ‘a book everyone owns’ has a satisfying answer (SPOILER an A-Z London map guide), there’s some nice scenery of modern London (hello to The Gherkin) and the episode as a whole is entertaining. I think British television finally has it’s replacement for Inspector Morse.

This Sherlock episode contains mild swear words, adult dialogue and violence.

 

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

Sherlock 1.01 A Study in Pink (2010, Crime Detective Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Benedict Cumberbatch: Sherlock Holmes
Martin Freeman: Dr. John Watson
Writer: Steven Moffat
Co-Creator: Mark Gatiss
Writer (Original Works): Arthur Conan Doyle
Producer: Sue Vertue
Director: Paul McGuigan
Phil Davis: Jeff
Executive Producer: Mark Gatiss
Executive Producer: Steven Moffat
Executive Producer: Beryl Vertue
Actor (uncredited) Mycroft Holmes: Mark Gatiss

Sherlock 1.01 Study in Pink, A (2010)

Three suicides in a row; all for seemingly stable people, all via the same poison pill, all in places where they shouldn’t ever be. The police consider them linked but you can’t have serial suicides. A fourth victim causes the police to turn to self-appointed consulting detective Sherlock Holmes who insists this is the work of a serial killer and who is breaking in a new flat-mate, Dr. John Watson.

7/10

Martin Freeman. Crack-shot adrenalin-junkie soldier. No. Freeman aside, this is a impressive start for a new show based on the work of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and his consulting detective (‘I’m the only one because I invented the job’) Sherlock Holmes. The update to present-day works fine and there is enough clever stuff to make Holmes appear brilliant as he translates information into the most likely explanation. The only notable mis-step is the Moriarty reveal which is unnecessary and required the use of the episode’s only horrible scene; sadly, with our hero being horrible. The remainder of the final half-hour is masterful stuff (and a major addition to the A Study in Scarlet source story) as the episode absolutely entices you and Holmes into a chat with the murderer (a fantastic Phil Davis) and leaves us with the question as to which pill was the good pill. Leaving the audience wanting more and talking about it is a great sign.

This Sherlock episode contains brief graphic gun violence, brief unpleasant torture scene.

 

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links