Aces Go Places II (1983) – 7/10 action comedy movie review

AmazonBuy Aces Go Places II aka Mad Mission Part 2 aka Zuijia paidang daxian shentong at Amazon

Cast / crew
Actor and Director Fattie: Eric Tsang
Screenplay Writer: Bak-Ming Wong
Sam Hui: King Kong
Karl Maka: Albert Au
Sylvia Chang: Supt. Nancy Ho
Tsui Hark: FBI

Aces Go Places II aka Mad Mission Part 2 aka Zuijia paidang daxian shentong (1983)

When King Kong gets framed for a bank robbery, the real robbers insist that he go and buy a diamond with counterfeit money from the mafia who have sent Black Glove, an American assassin and brother of White Glove (killed in the first movie), to make sure that the deal goes down and King Kong and Baldy are despatched.

7/10

A gloriously insane mess of action scenes and funny comedy hurled at the screen and quickly wiped off so that more can be thrown. Some of the action is terrific, some of it is just infectiously insane. The comedy works most of the time and some of it is hilarious thanks to largely relying on slapstick. One instance that saw Baldy literally fly across the room during the fun Valentine’s Day rumble would have caused a genuine spit-take if I’d been drinking at the time. The inclusion of Clint Eastwood lookalike (Filthy Harry) is charmingly bizarre. Look out for famed Hong Kong director Tsui Hark as FBI and it was interesting to see the half-a-car chase done here two years before everyone saw it in the Bond movie A View to a Kill. This is a fun, snappy, entertaining movie from start to finish.

This movie contains violence, bad language

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Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (1983) – 7/10 science fiction fantasy action adventure movie review

Cast / crew
Mark Hamill: Luke Skywalker
Harrison Ford: Han Solo
Carrie Fisher: Princess Leia
Alec Guinness: Ben (Obi-wan) Kenobi
Director: Richard Marquand
Writer (Screenplay): Lawrence Kasdan
Writer (Screenplay): George Lucas
Writer (Story): George Lucas
Producer: Howard Kazanjian
Executive Producer: George Lucas
Billy Dee Williams: Lando Calrissian
Anthony Daniels: C-3PO
Peter Mayhew: Chewbacca
Sebastian Shaw: Anakin Skywalker
Ian McDiarmid: The Emperor
Frank Oz: Yoda
David Prowse: Darth Vader
James Earl Jones: Darth Vader

Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (1983)

Han Solo lies carbon frozen in the hands of hideous gangster, Jabba the Hutt. As Luke and Leia race to the rescue, the Rebel commanders are planning their next move against the Empire. Even as Rebel ships mass to form a giant armada, the Galactic Emperor orders construction to begin on a new space station, many times more powerful than the dreaded Death Star.

7/10

"Only now, at the end, do you understand." – The Emperor

Something is definitely missing, a magic X factor, but this remains a good, spectacular action movie, and closes the trilogy well. Dramatically, the only interest is in the scenes with Luke and Vader and, ultimately, the Emperor and they do not disappoint. Mark Hamill, David Prowse and James Earl Jones are all good but, as he would prove to be in the prequel trilogy, Ian McDiarmid is astonishing; oddly, gleefully, enthusiastically, whole-heartedly, entertainingly evil. Unfortunately, this only comprises a short period of the overall running time and the remainder, including, sadly, a slightly flat Harrison Ford and a whole stack of dialogue edited without snap (including a horrendous reprise for the ‘I love you / I know’ exchange), all feels a bit inconsequential and irrelevant.

This movie contains violence.

Classified U by BBFC. Universal: Suitable for All.

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T.J. Hooker 2.13 Too Late for Love (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Barbara Stock: Amy Robbins
Thom Christopher: Harry Cort
Theresa Saldana: Maria Santini
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Director: Michael Preece
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 2.13 Too Late for Love (1983)

When a series of fur coat robberies takes place, Romano is delighted to have a chance to reacquaint himself with his beautiful clothes model ex-girlfriend, Amy, but her appearance at the same location as the robberies is not a coincidence.

6/10

An improvement on writer Jack V. Fogarty’s previous additions to the series, this is solid entertainment and features a terrific scene where Romano punches Hooker (that’s after eulogising him earlier to a date and, to be fair, he is instantly mortified). There’s also some good action with very tidy stuntworrk in the opening chase, a more thoughtful than usual shootout mid-way and an impressive solo beat down by Romano for the climax.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence and a long look at stacy’s bum.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

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T.J. Hooker 3.12 Slay Ride (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Robert Dryer: Troy Eldridge
Philece Sampler: Sue Ann Eldridge
John McLiam: Father DeMarco
Marjoe Gortner: Marino
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Rick Husky
Director: Bruce Kessler
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.12 Slay Ride (1983)

While Hooker and Stacy are suffering from Christmas blues thanks to the prospect of spending the holiday period alone, they get involved in the case of a couple of armed robbers and their baby who they decide to abandon in a church.

6/10

Despite a very strong start featuring Hooker as Santa Claus executing a narcotics bust (arrest punchline: "Merry Christmas, punk!"), the story side of things gets progressively worse and even the car chases are rather underplayed. Refreshingly, Heather Locklear gets a storyline that doesn’t involve bikinis and impotently jumping into shot after an action scene finishes, Shatner gets a nice scene on the phone to his daughter, and there is still entertainment value to be had in the lead characters as they thoughtfully consider each other’s needs at Christmas time.

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T.J. Hooker 3.11 Undercover Affair (1983, Police Action Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Barry Primus: Martin Colson
Simone Griffeth: Paige Miller
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Simon Muntner
Director: Charles Picerni
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.11 Undercover Affair (1983)

Hooker interferes with a FBI operation to take down a major drug supplier when people he knows on the street start getting hurt. Then he discovers that an old lover, Paige Miller, is deep undercover as the suppliers’ girlfriend and that is something he really doesn’t like.

7/10

Classic episode in which you are not supposed to notice that Hooker is clearly in the wrong for almost the entire time as he refuses to see the larger picture in the case of an international drug dealer. Good action, great scenery chewing from Shatner and a director who doesn’t underestimate the scenic value of bikini-clad babes in this series.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, unpleasasnt scenes.

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T.J. Hooker 3.10 Blue Murder (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Grant Goodeve:
Jeana Tomasina: Gloria
Paul Burke:
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Paul B. Margolis
Director: Don Chaffey
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.10 Blue Murder (1983)

When a scumlord escapes punishment yet again, two cops decide to take things into their own hands and execute him. What will Hooker do when he discovers the truth?

6/10

This is still thoroughly entertaining but the plot is identical to SPOILER Clint Eastwood’s Dirty Harry sequel Magnum Force and it suffers in comparison. Special mention for the drug dealer’s fantastic car.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence.

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T.J. Hooker 3.08 Matter of Passion (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
John Vernon: Grant Chandler
Kristen Meadows:
Marc Alaimo: Ray Downing
Robert O’Reilly: Jack Riker
Lloyd Haynes: Lew Jensen
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Dick Nelson
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.09 Matter of Passion (1983)

When Hooker discovers the dead body of a beautiful young woman on the beach he determines to exact justice despite being unable to identify her.

6/10

It’s a bit more variable than most episodes with several strong sequences where things are taken far more slowly than is usual for the show. A dead girl’s hand grasping Hooker’s arm makes an impression as does quietly looking around her apartment when they eventually find it. However, the romantic angle is half-hearted (though bikini-heavy) and there are two notably naff sequences where the bad guys attempt to assassinate Hooker (the car bomb even uses recycled footage from an earlier episode, badly). As a bonus, Romano does manage to wear the worst funeral suit in television history.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, mild unpleasant scenes.

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T.J. Hooker S03E08 The Trial (1983) – 5/10 Police Action Courtroom Drama TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Lenore Kasdorf: Gina Canelli
Jeff Pomerantz: Briggs
Lee de Broux: Frank Abbott
Charles Dierkop: Doud
James Hong: Mr. Hong
Robert Hooks: Lt. Ellis
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Stephen Downing
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker S03E08 Trial, The (1983)

When Romano gets shot (again), he blames Gina Canelli, a young female officer who he and Canelli’s partner claim could have shot the suspect. Hooker agrees to defend Canelli at the trial much to Romano’s chagrin.

5/10

This is not a well-written episode as most things happen unconvincingly but necessarily for the plot to continue. Therefore, we have Hooker acting as a lawyer in a police tribunal and most of the dialogue and plot therein appears to have been written by somebody who watches Hollywood television trials as opposed to someone who is aware of the law. A couple of minutes after Hooker prevents a previous incident being brought up against his client, he brings up a previous incident against a witness, breaking him. The episode is well-paced and interesting, however, as there is friction between Hooker and Romano and, while there’s not enough time to squeeze in a full-size car chase, a baddie does drive around a corner and into a florists, and that’ll have to do.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence, mild gory and unpleasant scenes.

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T.J. Hooker 3.07 A Child is Missing (1983, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano]
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan]
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Henry Darrow: Miguel Gomez
Steven Keats: David Burke
Barbara Horan: Paula Bennett
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Jack B. Sowards
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.07 Child is Missing, A (1983)

Hooker follows a child kidnapper all the way to Mexico.

5/10

This episode is a little let down by an unusually flat William Shatner and the unconvincing Hooker-strides-into-Mehico storyline. But we still get two car chases, several lovely ladies, Hooker thrown down a flight of stairs and an interesting climax that sees Hooker look like a thug because he isn’t wearing his uniform but is still behaving as though he is. As I was watching this episode, I kept thinking to myself how reminiscent the music was of Robert Zemeckis’ 1984 action hit Romancing the Stone. As it turns out, this episode was scored by Alan Silvestri, the composer on Romancing the Stone, exploring the Mexican rhythms he would employ the following year.

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T.J. Hooker 3.05 The Shadow of Truth (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Helen Shaver: Lisa Jericho
Nicolas Coster: Kevin Mundy
Luke Askew: Brad Thurman
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Robert Sherman
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 3.05 Shadow of Truth, The (1983)

Hooker’s latest girlfriend, investigative reporter Lisa Jericho, is rubbing the police department up the wrong way by exposing dodgy tactics employed by some but another target of her investigations is taking action: a contract is put out on her life.

6/10

Freqently solid fun, if credulity-stretching, with surprisingly few car chases but good chemistry between Shatner and Helen Shaver as his latest girlfriend. Hooker’s insanely wide-ranging knowledge this week includes geology and the ability to instantly analyse soil content just from picking it up. Oh, and he can bend the laws of space and time as he manages to drive down a hill, identify a man, work out what he’s doing there, run across a car park and leap across a car before the man can flip a switch. There is also plenty of bikini and girl-in-man’s-shirt (hurrah!) action to keep the less demanding male viewer entertained. The climax also features a bit of unintentional hilarity as Lisa Jericho looks aghast at the dead body of the baddie, then up at Hooker… who grins back at her. It’s so wrong, it’s awesome.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, unpleasant scenes.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.04 The Cheerleader Murder (1983, Police Action Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Joe Penny: Miles Dickson
James Luisi: George Laszlo
Katherine Justice: Joan Wagner
Jenny Sherman: Michelle
Dana Kimmell: Lisa Telford
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Gerald Sanford
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 3.04 Cheerleader Murder, The (1983)

Hooker gets involved in a teenage pornography ring when a beautiful cheerleader turns up dead full of drugs and having recently had an abortion.

7/10

Hooker tackles illegal teen pornography and drugs and Shatner rewards the viewer with the climactic line "Cuff him. Then wash your hands." Or in response to a teenage car thief’s excuse of ‘that was my Dad’s car’, Hooker almost subconsciously retorts "Put that to music." Awesome. We also get a couple of good car chases, Romano in a speedo, Stacey in a bikini (apparently, that’s how you cope with the trauma of unexpectedly finding a dead young girl), a monstrously good gay gag with Romano (Romano, shocked: "If anybody’s gonna pick me up, it’s gonna be someone in high heels and a miniskirt." Gay guy: "Don’t leave. I’ll be back.") and even a dance sequence for the Shat.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains adult dialogue.

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T.J. Hooker 3.03 Chinatown (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
James Shigeta: Chow Duc Khan
Patricia Thomson: Nancy Ling Khan
Peter Brown: Lt. Drummer
Benson Fong: Lee Chan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Simon Muntner
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Director: Don Chaffey

T.J. Hooker 3.03 Chinatown (1983)

When Hooker gets involved in weapons smuggling in Chinatown it brings back memories from his first days as a beat officer.

6/10

Great fun with Shatner on top form as he finds out he may have a daughter. Richard Herd replacement Peter Brown (as Lt. Drummer) is dreadfully irritating but Adrian Zmed has a fun scene at Hooker’s motel room. Heather Locklear provokes unintentional laughter as she leaps into action scenes after they’re over and points her gun worthlessly though the blame lies with the producers. James Darren makes you wonder how he got the job as he has no charisma and no camaraderie with the other principle cast. James Shigeta is a decent baddie with his wonderfully smooth voice and even has a bat-cave.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence.

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T.J. Hooker 3.02 Carnal Express (1983, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Richard Lynch: Virgil Dobbs
Peter Brown: Lt. Drummer
Trisha Noble: Lorraine Daggett
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Joe Viola
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.

T.J. Hooker 3.02 Carnal Express (1983)

Hooker gets involved in a white slavery case but Stacey decides to go undercover as an exotic dancer to speed up the investigation.

5/10

While giving Heather Locklear more to do and less to wear may sound like the recipe for a great episode, she, like bland co-stars Adrian Zmed and James Darren, does not have the charisma or talent to carry the weight of the show. Richard Lynch is a quality bad guy at any time though and there’s still plenty of dirtbags for Hooker to chastise including a joyous epithet spat at Lynch. Also, Hooker on white slavery: "When they’re taken off my streets, like Bonnie, that’s different, and I’m damn well gonna put a stop to it." You know, if we ever cross T.J. Hooker and Valentino Rossi we should appoint him king of the world.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence.

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T.J. Hooker: 2.22 Lady in Blue (1983, Police Action Drama) – 4/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Anne-Marie Martin: Officer Karen Hall
Leo Rossi: Tate
Justin Lord:
Roger Newman:
Percy Rodrigues: Jason
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Rick Husky
Director: William Shatner

T.J. Hooker 2.22 Lady in Blue (1983)

When Hooker’s gung-ho method of policing is imitated by a new female recruit, she is shot and badly injured (she loses a leg). Hooker blames himself and determines to get the maggots responsible.

4/10

Despite Shatner delivering a whole stack of "maggot" and "scum" speeches (a good thing), this is a horribly dated and rather unbalanced episode. Star Shatner can probably only blame himself: he directed this one.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

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T.J. Hooker 2.21 Payday Pirates (1983, Police Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
James Darren: Officer Jim Corrigan
Jean Leclerc: Jake Hendricks
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Paul B. Margolis
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.

T.J. Hooker 2.21 Payday Pirates (1983)

An armed robbery ends up with Fran getting hit on the head and suffering extensive damage to her optical nerve. As Fran struggles to keep her sight, Hooker struggles to reign in his rage as he relentlessly pursues the maggot responsible. Meanwhile, he assigns Stacy to in-the-field training with no-nonsense cop-with-a-past (of course, what other type of cop is there?) Jim Corrigan.

6/10

A guilty pleasure not to be taken too seriously and enjoyed with a silly grin on your face as Hooker deals with the maggots and scum that might render his wife blind. "If God’s gonna help somebody, it’s not likely to be you, friend." As usual for season two, there are is also a generous amount of good action with two car chases, a Hooker versus stock car showdown and Stacy executing a side-handle baton throw to take down a crook. New cast member James Darren tries to look annoyed with Heather Locklear but fails.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

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T.J. Hooker 2.20 The Hostages (1983) – 7/10 police action drama TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Jonathan Banks: Freddy Baker
Lance LeGault: Lt. Decker
Edward Walsh: Henry Baker
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Robert Earll
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 2.20 Hostages, The (1983)

After foiling an armed robbery, shooting and injuring one (“not nearly bad enough”) and arresting another with another two getting away, Hooker discovers that they are all members of the same family. Trying to locate the two missing robbers, it quickly becomes clear that they are going to try and break their injured father out of hospital… where Hooker’s ex-wife Fran works and Stacey has gone to visit a critically ill child (of course).

7/10

Snappy classic Hooker action with Shatner demonstrating yet again that he is a true TV hero (and Adrian Zmed, though very pretty, is not). The casting is good as Jonathan Banks does what he does best (be a maggot) and Lance LeGault also does his thing (hard-headed arrogance). The writing isn’t too good with the requirement that Hooker always be right leaving the aforementioned Lance LeGault as his usual bad good guy but there are some nice action moments to make up for it (especially Hooker vaulting a hospital gurney) and the laudable tension is momentarily relieved by the world’s slowest elevator. There’s also a really nice epilogue where Hooker gets a hug from the little girl he saved.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains adult dialogue and violence.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.19 Requiem for a Cop (1983, Police Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Don Gordon: Frank D’Costa
Dey Young: Linda Silver
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Gerald Sanford
Director: Don Chaffey

T.J. Hooker 2.19 Requiem for a Cop (1983)

When a derelict building is targeted by an arsonist it doesn’t appear to be much more than mindless vandalism. But the presence of squatters and the subsequent murder of the private investigator looking into the arson (known to Hooker, of course, he was his first police partner!), indicates something more is behind them.

6/10

Yet another one of Hooker’s friends and ex-partners gets into hot water, then gets killed, while Shatner delivers a splendid "He was a COP" speech and "We have enough litter on the beach without scumballs like you" line. Hurrah! Also look out for an early appearance by future NYPD Blue / CSI Miami star David Caruso as a bomber. In the ‘Hooker’s-amazing-at-everything’ category, he also reveals an uncanny betting ability beating another of Romano’s wacky gadgets at predicting a horse race.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains unpleasant scenes.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.18 Raw Deal (1983, Police Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Cristina Raines: Nancy Winters
Carlos Romero:
Ann Gillespie:
Jim Brown: Frank Barnett
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Writer: Simon Muntner
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 2.18 Raw Deal (1983)

Hooker gets involved in drug dealing on his patch as a poker house operator and wannabe drug lord blackmails gambling addicts who have run up unpayable debts into picking up and dropping off his supplies.

6/10

While only mustering an average score, this is consistently average and entertaining as opposed to a poor episode with highlights. The stunt-work is rather better than expected with a very good high fall and an agreeably ludicrous fight on a (flying) helicopter skid while Shatner spits out another of his marvelous anti-maggot speeches. The side-plot reveals Hooker’s amazing ability to accurately prophesy delivery times for pregnant women.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, unpleasant scene.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.17 Sweet Sixteen and Dead (1983, Police Drama) – 6/10 TV review

William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Paul Kent: Pearl
Clarence Williams III: Decker
Toni Hudson: Star Taylor
Sharon Farrell: Irene Gordon
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Joe Viola
Director: William Shatner

T.J. Hooker 2.17 Sweet Sixteen and Dead (1983)

When a sixteen-year-old hooker is killed after witnessing a local hoodlum paying off a government representative, Hooker gets to learn of another witness: an ex-prostitute named Star. Trouble is, the hoodlum also knows her identity, the only thing neither of them know is her location. Who will reach her first?

6/10

As with most Shatner-directed outings, this is a lesser episode but it is rammed with Hooker quotes ("It was a man-made accident. And I want to nail that man.") culminating in calling the villain "chump." There’s also a decapitated teddy bear and a great comedy sub-plot about selling cookies for Hooker’s daughter Chrissie.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains adult dialogue and substance abuse and extreme teddy bear violence.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.16 Vengeance is Mine (1983, Police Drama) – 9/10 TV review

William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Randolph Powell: Larry Foster
Michele Tobin: Valerie McGuire
Carmen Argenziano: Chuck Taylor
Leonard Nimoy: Lieutenant Paul Maguire
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Allison Hock
Director: Phil Bondelli

T.J. Hooker 2.16 Vengeance is Mine (1983)

A rapist attacks the daughter of one of Hooker’s ex-partners, Paul Maguire. Despite identifying the rapist as a local lawyer and Maguire’s status as a Lieutenant of Detectives, a conviction proves difficult to obtain and causes severe strain on Maguire, who decides to take matters into his own hands. Meanwhile, Hooker’s also having banking trouble.

9/10

It’s nice to see Shatner with old Star Trek sparring partner Leonard Nimoy who brings a touch of class to the proceedings and matches The Shat for intensity. The script is also better than most episodes though, fortunately, we still get Shatner spitting out delicious lines such as "This time, maggot, you stay inside." The episode does a terrific job of highlighting the difficulties in prosecuting such a personal crime in the Eighties (no DNA evidence then) and the impotence felt by those who feel responsible for letting it happen. There’s a good foot chase which ends with Hooker leaping about twenty feet from a first-floor parapet onto a suspect and it climaxes with a great scene between Shatner and Nimoy. Top Hooker.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains adult dialogue and violence.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.15 The Mumbler (1983, Police Drama) – 7/10 TV review

AmazonBuy The Mumbler at Amazon

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Sam Melville: Hank Carmichael
Paul Regina: Larry Coates
Michael Cavanaugh: Carl Hines
Sydney Penny: Katie Coates
Jo McDonnell: Sarah Campbell
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Series Creator: Rick Husky
Writer: Joe Viola
Director: Don Chaffey

T.J. Hooker 2.15 The Mumbler (1983)

Hooker experience of – get this – breeding pigeons gives him a crucial edge in the case of an armed robbery when he meets the younger sister of one of the protagonists who is also a ‘mumbler’, a person with better connection to pigeons than people.

7/10

Entertaining episode with added bonus of discovering Hooker’s past as a pigeon trainer (!) and a car chase whose mid-section (when they go through a storm drain) is a replay of the chase in Season One episode The Witness. They even leave in the bit where you can clearly see the camera crew as the cars enter the drain! Despite this brief regurgitation, the action is generous and thrilling as John Davis supplies plenty of funky music and it culminates in a striking location (under a roller-coaster) with a nice bit of close-quarters work from Hooker with the side handle baton.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains , Violence

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

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The A-Team 1.03 Children of Jamestown (1983, TV) – 5/10 review

George Peppard: John "Hannibal" Smith
Dirk Benedict: Templeton "Face" Peck
Melinda Culea: Amy Amanda Allen
Dwight Schultz: "Howling Mad" Murdock
Mr. T: B.A. Baracus
Co-Executive Producer: Frank Lupo
Writer (Series’ Creator): Frank Lupo
Writer (Series’ Creator): Stephen J. Cannell
Gerrit Graham:
Ron Hayes:
John Saxon: Martin James
John Carter:
Writer: Stephen J. Cannell
Director: Christian I. Nyby II
Second Unit Director: Craig R. Baxley

A-Team, The 1.03 Children of Jamestown (1983)

The A-Team is hired to rescue Sheila Rogers, a young girl who has been brainwashed into a religious cult. Brilliantly, they manage to get themselves captured in the escape.

5/10

The A-Team starts here with the opening narration, the van and Dirk Benedict in the cast. Annoyingly, it’s rather decent fun. Annoying, as it’s weakly scripted and writer Stephen J. Cannell has already run out of ideas and resorted to insanity instead of character. John Saxon has the unfortunate responsibility of carrying off the loopy reverend but his stunt double does deliver an hilarious comeuppance by being propelled out of a jeep. The team themselves are fine with a really nice moment where they join hands in support to lift Amy’s spirits and another nice detail when Hannibal cleans a Bible before leaving for the end credits.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

The A-Team 1.01,02 Mexican Slayride (1983, TV) – 4/10 review

George Peppard: John "Hannibal" Smith
Melinda Culea: Amy Amanda Allen
Tim Dunigan: Templeton "Face" Peck
Dwight Schultz: "Howling Mad" Murdock
Mr. T: Bosco "B.A." Baracus
Executive Producer: Stephen J. Cannell
Co-Executive Producer: Frank Lupo
Writer (Series’ Creator): Frank Lupo
Writer (Series’ Creator): Stephen J. Cannell
Writer: Frank Lupo
Writer: Stephen J. Cannell
Director: Rod Holcomb
William Lucking: Colonel Lynch
Philip Sterling: Grant Eldridge
Sergio Calderon: Valdez
Ron Palillo:
Melody Anderson: Avon – Airplane Salesgirl
William Windom: Al Massey
Stunt Coordinator: Craig R. Baxley
Second Unit Director: Craig R. Baxley

A-Team, The 1.01,02 Mexican Slayride (1983)

Reporter Al Massey gets himself kidnapped in Mexico but friend and fellow reporter Amy Allen can’t get anyone to help or take her seriously when he doesn’t report in. She hears about a team of mercenaries called the A-Team and sets out to find if they really exist and if she can hire them.

4/10

It’s rather difficult to see what made the A-Team such a successful show from this pilot. It doesn’t have an interesting or even convincing story and the script is regularly so awful, it is as if the makers presume audiences don’t watch their show with the sound on. George Peppard doesn’t even play himself all the way through enlisting a back-of-wig double even for some dialogue scenes. The two things that do stand out about this pilot episode are a number of terrific vehicle stunts and, unforgettably, Mr T. He delivers the gruff exterior / sweet interior character with considerable charm and charisma and would be rewarded by becoming an international icon.

This A-Team, The episode contains bad language and violence.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.