Aces Go Places II (1983) – 7/10 action comedy movie review

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Cast / crew
Actor and Director Fattie: Eric Tsang
Screenplay Writer: Bak-Ming Wong
Sam Hui: King Kong
Karl Maka: Albert Au
Sylvia Chang: Supt. Nancy Ho
Tsui Hark: FBI

Aces Go Places II aka Mad Mission Part 2 aka Zuijia paidang daxian shentong (1983)

When King Kong gets framed for a bank robbery, the real robbers insist that he go and buy a diamond with counterfeit money from the mafia who have sent Black Glove, an American assassin and brother of White Glove (killed in the first movie), to make sure that the deal goes down and King Kong and Baldy are despatched.

7/10

A gloriously insane mess of action scenes and funny comedy hurled at the screen and quickly wiped off so that more can be thrown. Some of the action is terrific, some of it is just infectiously insane. The comedy works most of the time and some of it is hilarious thanks to largely relying on slapstick. One instance that saw Baldy literally fly across the room during the fun Valentine’s Day rumble would have caused a genuine spit-take if I’d been drinking at the time. The inclusion of Clint Eastwood lookalike (Filthy Harry) is charmingly bizarre. Look out for famed Hong Kong director Tsui Hark as FBI and it was interesting to see the half-a-car chase done here two years before everyone saw it in the Bond movie A View to a Kill. This is a fun, snappy, entertaining movie from start to finish.

This movie contains violence, bad language

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Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (1983) – 7/10 science fiction fantasy action adventure movie review

Cast / crew
Mark Hamill: Luke Skywalker
Harrison Ford: Han Solo
Carrie Fisher: Princess Leia
Alec Guinness: Ben (Obi-wan) Kenobi
Director: Richard Marquand
Writer (Screenplay): Lawrence Kasdan
Writer (Screenplay): George Lucas
Writer (Story): George Lucas
Producer: Howard Kazanjian
Executive Producer: George Lucas
Billy Dee Williams: Lando Calrissian
Anthony Daniels: C-3PO
Peter Mayhew: Chewbacca
Sebastian Shaw: Anakin Skywalker
Ian McDiarmid: The Emperor
Frank Oz: Yoda
David Prowse: Darth Vader
James Earl Jones: Darth Vader

Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi (1983)

Han Solo lies carbon frozen in the hands of hideous gangster, Jabba the Hutt. As Luke and Leia race to the rescue, the Rebel commanders are planning their next move against the Empire. Even as Rebel ships mass to form a giant armada, the Galactic Emperor orders construction to begin on a new space station, many times more powerful than the dreaded Death Star.

7/10

"Only now, at the end, do you understand." – The Emperor

Something is definitely missing, a magic X factor, but this remains a good, spectacular action movie, and closes the trilogy well. Dramatically, the only interest is in the scenes with Luke and Vader and, ultimately, the Emperor and they do not disappoint. Mark Hamill, David Prowse and James Earl Jones are all good but, as he would prove to be in the prequel trilogy, Ian McDiarmid is astonishing; oddly, gleefully, enthusiastically, whole-heartedly, entertainingly evil. Unfortunately, this only comprises a short period of the overall running time and the remainder, including, sadly, a slightly flat Harrison Ford and a whole stack of dialogue edited without snap (including a horrendous reprise for the ‘I love you / I know’ exchange), all feels a bit inconsequential and irrelevant.

This movie contains violence.

Classified U by BBFC. Universal: Suitable for All.

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T.J. Hooker 2.13 Too Late for Love (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Barbara Stock: Amy Robbins
Thom Christopher: Harry Cort
Theresa Saldana: Maria Santini
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Director: Michael Preece
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 2.13 Too Late for Love (1983)

When a series of fur coat robberies takes place, Romano is delighted to have a chance to reacquaint himself with his beautiful clothes model ex-girlfriend, Amy, but her appearance at the same location as the robberies is not a coincidence.

6/10

An improvement on writer Jack V. Fogarty’s previous additions to the series, this is solid entertainment and features a terrific scene where Romano punches Hooker (that’s after eulogising him earlier to a date and, to be fair, he is instantly mortified). There’s also some good action with very tidy stuntworrk in the opening chase, a more thoughtful than usual shootout mid-way and an impressive solo beat down by Romano for the climax.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence and a long look at stacy’s bum.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

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T.J. Hooker 3.12 Slay Ride (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Robert Dryer: Troy Eldridge
Philece Sampler: Sue Ann Eldridge
John McLiam: Father DeMarco
Marjoe Gortner: Marino
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Rick Husky
Director: Bruce Kessler
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.12 Slay Ride (1983)

While Hooker and Stacy are suffering from Christmas blues thanks to the prospect of spending the holiday period alone, they get involved in the case of a couple of armed robbers and their baby who they decide to abandon in a church.

6/10

Despite a very strong start featuring Hooker as Santa Claus executing a narcotics bust (arrest punchline: "Merry Christmas, punk!"), the story side of things gets progressively worse and even the car chases are rather underplayed. Refreshingly, Heather Locklear gets a storyline that doesn’t involve bikinis and impotently jumping into shot after an action scene finishes, Shatner gets a nice scene on the phone to his daughter, and there is still entertainment value to be had in the lead characters as they thoughtfully consider each other’s needs at Christmas time.

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T.J. Hooker 3.11 Undercover Affair (1983, Police Action Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Barry Primus: Martin Colson
Simone Griffeth: Paige Miller
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Simon Muntner
Director: Charles Picerni
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.11 Undercover Affair (1983)

Hooker interferes with a FBI operation to take down a major drug supplier when people he knows on the street start getting hurt. Then he discovers that an old lover, Paige Miller, is deep undercover as the suppliers’ girlfriend and that is something he really doesn’t like.

7/10

Classic episode in which you are not supposed to notice that Hooker is clearly in the wrong for almost the entire time as he refuses to see the larger picture in the case of an international drug dealer. Good action, great scenery chewing from Shatner and a director who doesn’t underestimate the scenic value of bikini-clad babes in this series.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, unpleasasnt scenes.

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T.J. Hooker 3.10 Blue Murder (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Grant Goodeve:
Jeana Tomasina: Gloria
Paul Burke:
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Paul B. Margolis
Director: Don Chaffey
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.10 Blue Murder (1983)

When a scumlord escapes punishment yet again, two cops decide to take things into their own hands and execute him. What will Hooker do when he discovers the truth?

6/10

This is still thoroughly entertaining but the plot is identical to SPOILER Clint Eastwood’s Dirty Harry sequel Magnum Force and it suffers in comparison. Special mention for the drug dealer’s fantastic car.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence.

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T.J. Hooker 3.08 Matter of Passion (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
John Vernon: Grant Chandler
Kristen Meadows:
Marc Alaimo: Ray Downing
Robert O’Reilly: Jack Riker
Lloyd Haynes: Lew Jensen
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Dick Nelson
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.09 Matter of Passion (1983)

When Hooker discovers the dead body of a beautiful young woman on the beach he determines to exact justice despite being unable to identify her.

6/10

It’s a bit more variable than most episodes with several strong sequences where things are taken far more slowly than is usual for the show. A dead girl’s hand grasping Hooker’s arm makes an impression as does quietly looking around her apartment when they eventually find it. However, the romantic angle is half-hearted (though bikini-heavy) and there are two notably naff sequences where the bad guys attempt to assassinate Hooker (the car bomb even uses recycled footage from an earlier episode, badly). As a bonus, Romano does manage to wear the worst funeral suit in television history.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, mild unpleasant scenes.

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