T.J. Hooker 1.02 The Streets (1982, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
April Clough: Officer Victoria Taylor
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Karen Carlson: Tracy Hill
George Murdock: Police Detective
Gary Frank: Brett Williams
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Creator: Rick Husky
Writer: Rick Husky
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 1.02 Streets, The (1982)

Hooker gets involved with a serial mugger when he witnesses the culprit leaving the scene of a crime.

5/10

While Hooker’s miraculous expertise here runs to intimate knowledge of a bus route, the criminal and female journalist are both unconvincing and uninteresting. That said, Shatner convinces that he can’t stand the sight of her and he gets a couple of decent chase sequences including one very well filmed run along a high wall and jump onto a bus.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains threatened violence.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

T.J. Hooker 1.01 The Protectors (1982, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Richard Lawson: McNeil
Adrian Zmed: Vince Romano
Brian Patrick Clarke: Canfield
John Gladstein: Granger
Kelly Harmon:
Jo McDonnell:
Deborah Shelton: Lacy Canfield
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Rick Husky
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 1.01 Protectors, The (1982)

Demoted to sergeant after his partner was killed, policeman T.J. Hooker is assigned to run a scheme training new recruits as quickly as possible and getting them into on the job training.

5/10

Surprisingly subdued pilot movie (it’s clearly aiming to be more gritty than the show turned out) but one wishes that there was more of The Shat being a hero in it. His Dirty Harry stuff at the burger stand and a hilarious finger-wagging in his opening speech is all we get but at least we would have several series of a classic cop show to make up for it.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, unpleasant scenes.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.18 Death on the Line (1984, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Kimberly Beck: Linda Stevens
Lynne Moody: Dr. Pamela Carter
John Dennis Johnston: Cliff Tanner
Jonathan Perpich: Dan Stevens
James Whitmore, Jr.: Frank Bryce
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.18 Death on the Line (1984)

When a robber and a rapist team up, it confuses the trail left for Hooker and co. but he soon sniffs the truth.

6/10

Solid episode which handles the serious topic of rape with due seriousness and balance but it’s all a little bit flat. This is probably due to the almost complete lack of pumping music during the action sequences. It also comes as something of a surprise when they don’t get Stacy into her underwear to pose as bait for the rapist. The final chase is well done, though, with the rapist running out of bullets correctly, then punching Hooker after being tackled (the traditional end of the chase). Hooker doesn’t seem too perturbed by this uncommon event, however, and throws him over the side of a pier into the sea and nearly bursts out laughing.

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T.J. Hooker 3.16 Hooker’s Run (1984, Police Action Drama) – 4/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: [Officer Vince Romano]
Heather Locklear: [Officer Stacy Sheridan]
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Shanna Reed: [Angie Quine]
Kaleena Kiff: [Mary Quine]
Alex Rocco: [Frank Dio]
Tom Atkins: [Phil Parker]
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Co-Producer: Simon Muntner
Writer: Simon Muntner
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.16 Hooker’s Run (1984)

A murderer’s former girlfriend could send him to prison with her testimony, but her death has been ordered and there is a leak in the department. Hooker knows he can trust Vince, Stacy and Jim but everyone else, including ex-army buddy and Detective in Charge Phil Parker, must be under suspicion.

4/10

Badly plotted and unenthusiastically, though pacily, directed. Asking James Darren to do more acting is always a bad idea as he consistently comes across as creepy, inappropriate or unconvincing. Brilliantly, he even suggests that another character get “personality lessons.” Still, his role moves aside after a while and the action is pretty tidy. There’s a good staircase chase and rooftop battle, a very good high fall, Hooker gets through another squad car and there’s an A-Team-inspired climax.

Links

T.J. Hooker S03E08 The Trial (1983) – 5/10 Police Action Courtroom Drama TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Lenore Kasdorf: Gina Canelli
Jeff Pomerantz: Briggs
Lee de Broux: Frank Abbott
Charles Dierkop: Doud
James Hong: Mr. Hong
Robert Hooks: Lt. Ellis
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Stephen Downing
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker S03E08 Trial, The (1983)

When Romano gets shot (again), he blames Gina Canelli, a young female officer who he and Canelli’s partner claim could have shot the suspect. Hooker agrees to defend Canelli at the trial much to Romano’s chagrin.

5/10

This is not a well-written episode as most things happen unconvincingly but necessarily for the plot to continue. Therefore, we have Hooker acting as a lawyer in a police tribunal and most of the dialogue and plot therein appears to have been written by somebody who watches Hollywood television trials as opposed to someone who is aware of the law. A couple of minutes after Hooker prevents a previous incident being brought up against his client, he brings up a previous incident against a witness, breaking him. The episode is well-paced and interesting, however, as there is friction between Hooker and Romano and, while there’s not enough time to squeeze in a full-size car chase, a baddie does drive around a corner and into a florists, and that’ll have to do.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence, mild gory and unpleasant scenes.

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T.J. Hooker 3.07 A Child is Missing (1983, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano]
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan]
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Henry Darrow: Miguel Gomez
Steven Keats: David Burke
Barbara Horan: Paula Bennett
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Jack B. Sowards
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.07 Child is Missing, A (1983)

Hooker follows a child kidnapper all the way to Mexico.

5/10

This episode is a little let down by an unusually flat William Shatner and the unconvincing Hooker-strides-into-Mehico storyline. But we still get two car chases, several lovely ladies, Hooker thrown down a flight of stairs and an interesting climax that sees Hooker look like a thug because he isn’t wearing his uniform but is still behaving as though he is. As I was watching this episode, I kept thinking to myself how reminiscent the music was of Robert Zemeckis’ 1984 action hit Romancing the Stone. As it turns out, this episode was scored by Alan Silvestri, the composer on Romancing the Stone, exploring the Mexican rhythms he would employ the following year.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.09 A Cry for Help (1982, Police Action Drama) – 4/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: [Officer Vince Romano]
Heather Locklear: [Officer Stacy Sheridan]
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Henry Darrow:
Panchito Gomez: Danny Perez
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Creator: Rick Husky
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 2.09 Cry for Help, A (1982)

When a juvenile gang member is set up to take the blame for the murder of a drug supplier, Hooker gets personally involved.

4/10

Seriously cheesy episode as Hooker arranges an ear operation! Director Cliff Bole keeps the pace up and also delivers a nice stunt sequence with Hooker on a plane wing and dodging propellers (it’s also used in the title sequence).

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, unpleasant scenes.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.06 Walk a Straight Line (1983, Police Alcoholism Action Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Vincent Baggetta: Sam Dietrich
Belinda J. Montgomery: Laura Dietrich
Ron Joseph: Lester Sayles
Mitch Carter:
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Rick Kelbaugh
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 3.06 Walk a Straight Line (1983)

When a stakeout goes terribly wrong, Corrigan suspects that one of the detectives involved has a drink problem. The detective is one of Hooker’s ex-partners and he agrees to have a word with him but more action may need to be taken. Meanwhile, the Jumpsuit gang are pulling off more and more dangerous armed robberies.

7/10

This is a good Hooker episode which bolts the dancing girls, car chases and ‘splosions onto a well-handled backbone tackling alcoholism. Hooker managed to get himself out of trouble after the break-up of his marriage so he is in a good position to help his friend. As is the case, the friend denies there is a problem and doesn’t respond to words. It often takes a brush with mortality to push an alcoholic into remedial action and the episode does a good job of portraying this arc and keeping it serious while still keeping the awesomeness of the remainder of the show. The chase sequences are good with quality punchlines. The first ends with a huge explosion and the second with Hooker leaping through the air and tipping himself and the baddie through a barrier into the sea. Cue classic moment when the bad guy sputters that he can’t swim. So Hooker retorts “Let me help you” and punches him in the noggin. The last chase has Hooker leaping on to the back of a speeding van. Hurrah!

This T.J. Hooker episode contains unpleasant scenes, mild violence.

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T.J. Hooker 3.05 The Shadow of Truth (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Helen Shaver: Lisa Jericho
Nicolas Coster: Kevin Mundy
Luke Askew: Brad Thurman
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Robert Sherman
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 3.05 Shadow of Truth, The (1983)

Hooker’s latest girlfriend, investigative reporter Lisa Jericho, is rubbing the police department up the wrong way by exposing dodgy tactics employed by some but another target of her investigations is taking action: a contract is put out on her life.

6/10

Freqently solid fun, if credulity-stretching, with surprisingly few car chases but good chemistry between Shatner and Helen Shaver as his latest girlfriend. Hooker’s insanely wide-ranging knowledge this week includes geology and the ability to instantly analyse soil content just from picking it up. Oh, and he can bend the laws of space and time as he manages to drive down a hill, identify a man, work out what he’s doing there, run across a car park and leap across a car before the man can flip a switch. There is also plenty of bikini and girl-in-man’s-shirt (hurrah!) action to keep the less demanding male viewer entertained. The climax also features a bit of unintentional hilarity as Lisa Jericho looks aghast at the dead body of the baddie, then up at Hooker… who grins back at her. It’s so wrong, it’s awesome.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, unpleasant scenes.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.04 The Cheerleader Murder (1983, Police Action Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Joe Penny: Miles Dickson
James Luisi: George Laszlo
Katherine Justice: Joan Wagner
Jenny Sherman: Michelle
Dana Kimmell: Lisa Telford
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Gerald Sanford
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 3.04 Cheerleader Murder, The (1983)

Hooker gets involved in a teenage pornography ring when a beautiful cheerleader turns up dead full of drugs and having recently had an abortion.

7/10

Hooker tackles illegal teen pornography and drugs and Shatner rewards the viewer with the climactic line "Cuff him. Then wash your hands." Or in response to a teenage car thief’s excuse of ‘that was my Dad’s car’, Hooker almost subconsciously retorts "Put that to music." Awesome. We also get a couple of good car chases, Romano in a speedo, Stacey in a bikini (apparently, that’s how you cope with the trauma of unexpectedly finding a dead young girl), a monstrously good gay gag with Romano (Romano, shocked: "If anybody’s gonna pick me up, it’s gonna be someone in high heels and a miniskirt." Gay guy: "Don’t leave. I’ll be back.") and even a dance sequence for the Shat.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains adult dialogue.

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T.J. Hooker 1.05 The Witness (1982) – 6/10 police action drama TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
April Clough: Officer Victoria Taylor
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Lisa Hartman: Alison Baker
Jonathan Banks: Danny Scott
Michael O’Hare: Cal Jastrow
Robert Hogan: Neil Stoner
Michael Pataki: Nick
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Gerald Sanford
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 1.05 Witness, The (1982)

Hooker and Romano respond to a murder committed during a robbery but a witness to the crime proves unresponsive.

6/10

Plenty of action, Shatner being a hero and endlessly leaping off stuff onto bad guys (“the nose knows, junior”), a bit of humour and the lovely Lisa Hartman in shorts: what more could one want? Special mention for the scene in the opening car chase where you can see the camera crew filming the action as Hooker and the pursuee enter the storm drain. If you missed it, don’t worry, the producers would use the same footage several times during the next five years.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence, strong threat.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.20 The Hostages (1983) – 7/10 police action drama TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Jonathan Banks: Freddy Baker
Lance LeGault: Lt. Decker
Edward Walsh: Henry Baker
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Robert Earll
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 2.20 Hostages, The (1983)

After foiling an armed robbery, shooting and injuring one (“not nearly bad enough”) and arresting another with another two getting away, Hooker discovers that they are all members of the same family. Trying to locate the two missing robbers, it quickly becomes clear that they are going to try and break their injured father out of hospital… where Hooker’s ex-wife Fran works and Stacey has gone to visit a critically ill child (of course).

7/10

Snappy classic Hooker action with Shatner demonstrating yet again that he is a true TV hero (and Adrian Zmed, though very pretty, is not). The casting is good as Jonathan Banks does what he does best (be a maggot) and Lance LeGault also does his thing (hard-headed arrogance). The writing isn’t too good with the requirement that Hooker always be right leaving the aforementioned Lance LeGault as his usual bad good guy but there are some nice action moments to make up for it (especially Hooker vaulting a hospital gurney) and the laudable tension is momentarily relieved by the world’s slowest elevator. There’s also a really nice epilogue where Hooker gets a hug from the little girl he saved.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains adult dialogue and violence.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.05 Big Foot (1982, Crime Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Robin Dearden: Mkichelle Forrest
James O’Sullivan: Sergeant Wayne Conrad
George McDaniel: Donnie Pendleton
Ray Girardin: Hatfield
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Dallas Barnes
Writer: Joanne Barnes
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 2.05 Big Foot (1982)

A large rapist is at large, the only thing the police know is that the guy has big feet but then a jogger is attacked and Hooker and Romano interrupt him in the act.

6/10

T.J. Hooker always kept the victims in focus and his empathy for them and vehement disgust at the perpetrators gave the show it’s surprisingly uncommon and strong core. But it was always wrapped up in a fun package that allows the audience to also empathise with the victims and cheer along as Hooker delivers justice. This week he tackles a rapist, false confessions and Romano’s insistence that he isn’t getting enough fibre in his diet. Shatner gets to deliver another one of his wonderful ‘moral outrage’ speeches. "I’m not going to kill you, animal. There’s only one way to keep your kind of scum off the streets: a proper trial. That way everyone will know what you are." Hurrah!

This T.J. Hooker episode contains adult dialogue and violence.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.18 Raw Deal (1983, Police Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Cristina Raines: Nancy Winters
Carlos Romero:
Ann Gillespie:
Jim Brown: Frank Barnett
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Writer: Simon Muntner
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 2.18 Raw Deal (1983)

Hooker gets involved in drug dealing on his patch as a poker house operator and wannabe drug lord blackmails gambling addicts who have run up unpayable debts into picking up and dropping off his supplies.

6/10

While only mustering an average score, this is consistently average and entertaining as opposed to a poor episode with highlights. The stunt-work is rather better than expected with a very good high fall and an agreeably ludicrous fight on a (flying) helicopter skid while Shatner spits out another of his marvelous anti-maggot speeches. The side-plot reveals Hooker’s amazing ability to accurately prophesy delivery times for pregnant women.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, unpleasant scene.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

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T.J. Hooker 2.03 The Empty Gun (1982, Police Drama TV) – 7/10 review


Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Jeanette Nolan: Annie Grand
Herbert Jefferson, Jr.: Officer D. Benteen
David Michael Elliot: Minetti
Scott Thomson:
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Paul Savage
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 2.03 Empty Gun, The (1982)

When Romano has a cop killer in his gun sights but doesn’t kill him because he knows the criminal’s gun is empty, he is derided by most of the other beat officers. When the cop killer goes on to escape judicial punishment on technicalities and by lying, Romano suffers a crisis of confidence and wonders whether it would have been better to have taken the law into his own hands.

7/10

Starting out rather more seriously than earlier episodes with a superbly staged sequence where a cop gets killed, this adds an interesting moral dilemma to the still solid humour and action. Adrian Zmed gets his shirt off and pecs oiled for the girls and is solid in the acting stakes making this one of his best episodes. Hooker rounds things off with a "Happy birthday, punk" to a bleeding, just turned eighteen crim.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

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