House M.D. 6.16 Lockdown (2010, Drama) – 2/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Peter Jacobson: Dr. Chris Taub
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
David Strathairn: Nash
Neill Barry: Donald Lozinski
Riki Lindhome: Sarah Lozinski
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Eli Attie
Co-Executive Producer: Peter Blake
Executive Producer: Russel Friend
Executive Producer: Garrett Lerner
Executive Producer: David Shore
Writer (Screenplay): Russel Friend
Writer (Screenplay): Garrett Lerner
Writer (Screenplay): Peter Blake
Writer (Screenplay): Eli Attie
Writer (Story): Eli Attie
Writer (Story): Peter Blake
Director: Hugh Laurie

House M.D. 6.16 Lockdown (2010)

A baby disappears putting the hospital into lockdown. Wilson and Thirteen occupy themselves with a game of truth or dare. Taub and Foreman get high in Personnel. Chase and Cameron sign divorce papers. House winds up with a dying patient. Cuddy looks for the baby. The police and security team are probably useless at that kind of thing anyway.

2/10

One amazing House-ism is yer lot this week (he has fixed all his personnel records so that his malpractice suits were all brought by a patient named Lisa Cuddy). Everything else is indescribably awful.

This House M.D. episode contains adult dialogue and unpleasant and mild gory scenes and sexuality.

Links

House M.D. 6.12 Moving the Chains (2010, Black Comedy Medical Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Peter Jacobson: Dr. Chris Taub
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
Michael Weston: Lucas Douglas
Da’Vone McDonald: Daryl
Denise Y. Dowse: Glenda
Trever O’Brien: Jim Dunnagan
Orlando Jones: Marcus Foreman
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Executive Producer: Hugh Laurie
Executive Producer: Russel Friend
Executive Producer: Garrett Lerner
Executive Producer: David Shore
Writer: Russel Friend
Writer: Garrett Lerner
Director: David Straiton

House M.D. 6.12 Moving the Chains (2010)

A rising football player suffers a rage attack and beats himself with his helmet. When his brother comes out of prison, Foreman is dismayed to find House gives him a job. Meanwhile, hostilities commence between House and Wilson over a bathtub.

7/10

While the medical drama seems to rather fizzle out, the side-plots are terrific fun. House is portrayed as a "diabolical yet benevolent puppet-master" and that is a perfect summation of what he should be. No-one wants a purely caustic curmudgeon and that has been the case with most dramas inspired by House and this series own weakest moments. The current writers clearly have this supreme balance very much in mind and that is a great thing.

This House M.D. episode contains mild adult dialogue and self-inflicted violence.

Links

House M.D. 6.01 Broken (2009, Medical Black Comedy Drama TV) – 7/10 review

Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Franka Potente: Lydia
Lin-Manuel Miranda: Alvie
Megan Dodds: Dr. Beasley
Derek Richardson: Steve "Freedom Master"
Curtis Armstrong: Richter
Andrew Harrison Leeds: Dr. Medina
Andre Braugher: Dr. Darryl Nolan
Creator: David Shore
Writer: Russel Friend
Writer: Garrett Lerner
Writer: David Foster
Writer: David Shore
Director: Katie Jacobs

House M.D. 6.01 Broken (2009)

Having come through the Vicodin addiction, House moves to a psychiatric ward to deal with his deeper, non-physical issues. He thinks that he should be able to leave and has to start scheming to make sure it happens.

7/10

While the Franka Potente character conception absolutely never convinces (SPOILER House insults her, steals her car, nearly kills a dude then they have an affair, hmm), this is, nevertheless, an engrossing return. It’s well-acted by all, especially Franka Potente who manages to get us to accept her ridiculous actions, and Andre Braugher who I usually find intensely irritating but he’s great here. Katie Jacobs directs skilfully and manipulatively. Cleverly, it actually sticks very closely to the House formula of being wrong a lot, taking someone to the brink of death then pulling out miraculous results with acute observational skills and mental agility but they apply this formula to several different characters, including House, instead of just a single patient. I appreciate the writing team taking a little longer than usual (this is a feature-length episode) to reset everything back to normal and, applaudably, we’re not quite there yet. I look forward to next week’s episode.

This House M.D. episode contains adult dialogue and violence and a sex scene.

Links

House M.D. 5.19 Locked In (2009, TV) – 5/10 review

Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Writer (Series’ Creator): David Shore
Peter Jacobson: Dr. Chris Taub
Kal Penn: Dr. Lawrence Kutner
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
Faune A. Chambers: Molly
John Kapelos: Dr. Kurtz
Mos Def: Lee
Producer: David Foster
Executive Producer: Russel Friend
Executive Producer: Garrett Lerner
Executive Producer: David Shore
Writer: Russel Friend
Writer: Garrett Lerner
Writer: David Foster
Director: Daniel Attias

House M.D. 5.19 Locked In (2009)

House saves a man’s life after falling off his motorbike in New York. The man has Locked In Syndrome but as he attempts to diagnose, he is also trying to determine whether Taub is motivated to continue and Wilson wants to know what House was doing in New York in the first place.

5/10

House’s dialogue is as awesome as ever but he is hitting Taub when he’s down really hard. Otherwise, this feels like a concerted effort to win an award as this is a gimmick episode and large parts of the episode take place with the camera as the eyes of the patient-of-the-week. Unfortunately, the camera is waved around as if we are moving our whole head and so it doesn’t work from the get-go. Mos Def’s apparently casual delivery is always a nice change of pace whatever he’s in but, as the medical side of things is typically muddled, spending so much time on it reduces the effectiveness of the episode. The other little battle of wills is between House and Wilson as the latter tries to discover why the former had a motorcycle accident in New York but it’s rather flat.

Links

House M.D. 5.10 Let Them Eat Cake (2008, TV) – 6/10 review

Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Writer (Series’ Creator): David Shore
Peter Jacobson: Dr. Chris Taub
Kal Penn: Dr. Lawrence Kutner
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
Samantha Shelton: Emmy
Lori Petty: Janice
Executive Producer: David Shore
Writer: Russel Friend
Writer: Garrett Lerner
Director: Deran Sarafian

House M.D. 5.10 Let Them Eat Cake (2008)

Case-of-the-week is a 30-year-old fitness trainer who collapses with breathing difficulties without warning and without any apparent problem with her lungs. Thirteen starts treatment for her Huntingdon’s while Cuddy is slightly baffled by a lack of new requests for House and, for kicks, moves into his office while hers is being renovated.

6/10

After the misery of last week’s embarrassments, we have a return to multiple story lines, a case-of-the-week with no lasting consequences and gleefully silly games between Cuddy and House. Also, in the plus column, Olivia Wilde’s make-up has been made much more sympathetic and she connects with the audience rather than just looking freaky and there was a fun additional storyline with Cutner pretending to be House on a medical second opinion website. The medical case had some good psychological elements to it and the offer of the best medicine yet seen in the show: chocolate cake. This episode is a nice reminder of the earlier episodes with House’s clinic duty which served to break up the central plot-of-the-week and make it more manageable.

Links