House M.D. 6.19 The Choice (2010, Black Comedy Medical Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Peter Jacobson: Dr. Chris Taub
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
Cynthia Watros: Sam Carr
Adam Garcia: Ted
Eva Amurri: Nicole
Jennifer Crystal Foley: Rachel Taub
Jonathan Murphy: Cotter Macklin
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Supervising Producer: David Hoselton
Supervising Producer: David Foster
Executive Producer: Hugh Laurie
Writer: David Hoselton
Director: Juan J. Campanella

House M.D. 6.19 Choice, The (2010)

A man collapses speechless at the altar before he can say ‘I do’ but his symptoms miraculously clear up in House’s presence at the end of a sharp pointy needle. House team take it in turns to ask their boss out for the evening while House attempts to get Taub back into his marriage.

6/10

There’s fun in this episode but the conceit that homosexuality cannot be circumvented when you’re born with it and must be allowed it’s free expression seems foolish. Does this mean that a sociopath must be allowed to kill? That a person with any inescapable predilection should be allowed, even encouraged, to follow through? That said, the fact that the episode has broached this intriguing issue again is worthy. It always strikes me as fascinating that homosexuality is largely labelled in contemporary drama as uncontrollable and genetic. If it is, and you believe that evolution and genetics are the only key to all life, then aren’t homosexuals evolutionarily redundant, at best, a way of depopulating the planet? That aspect is never mentioned…

Links

House M.D. 6.06 Known Unknowns (2009, Medical Black Comedy Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Michael Weston: Lucas Douglas
Annabelle Attanasio: Jordan
Marcus Giamatti: Keener
Bianca Collins: Phoebe
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Doris Egan
Executive Producer: Hugh Laurie
Executive Producer: David Shore
Writer: Matthew V. Lewis
Writer: Doris Egan
Director: Greg Yaitanes

House M.D. 6.06 Known Unknowns (2009)

House attends a medical conference when he learns that Cuddy and her breasts (Patty and Selma, always smoking) are going but his patient-of-the-week – a young girl with swollen joints and extreme muscle fatigue – keeps requiring his long-distance attention.

6/10

House is on good form with Wilson and Cuddy this week (though don’t try naming your boss’s breasts at home, children; unless you’re a maverick genius, of course) though the patient-of-the-week diagnostic procedures are as unconvincing as ever and there is an unwelcome return for House’s Mini-Me Lucas Douglas (Michael Weston). The episode is again presenting the weight on the conscience of the doctor as arbiter of life and death with Chase having killed someone who wouldn’t have died and Wilson allowing a terminal patient to die early. I’m of the opinion, though, that doctors unnecessarily extend life beyond what the body would naturally allow through their use of intravenous feeds and respirators and the like. Without those things, the patient would die of their own accord much sooner. With those things, the doctors stop them dying but make their life painful, frustrating, humiliating and debilitated. If such forcible life-extending devices were not used for people who have terminal conditions, the number of cases warranting contemplation of euthanasia would, I suspect, plunge dramatically.

This House M.D. episode contains adult dialogue, references to substance abuse and unpleasant scenes.

Links

House M.D. 6.04 Instant Karma (2009, Medical Black Comedy Drama TV) – 7/10 review

Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
Lee Tergesen: Mr. Randall
Tanner Maguire: Jack Randall
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Greg Yaitanes
Executive Producer: Thomas L. Moran
Writer: Thomas L. Moran
Director: Greg Yaitanes

House M.D. 6.04 Instant Karma (2009)

With seventeen previous doctors having been unable to diagnose or treat his dying son, a billionaire insists that House take his case (despite House not having a medical licence, remember). House performs his usual diagnostic procedures and sets about taking the boy to the precipice of death before miraculously – oh… Perhaps money can’t buy everything.

7/10

In the House versus patient-of-the-week, versus Thirteen and versus Foreman / Chase, the result is two-one to House (I’m not saying which one he loses). While the shenanigans weren’t as funny or cunning as they have been and the medicine was, as usual, not terribly convincing, the balance of the episode made this feel largely sure-footed and House’s volunteering to deliver bad news is a welcome nod to his rehabilitation (no psychiatrist again this week). The Foreman / Chase storyline from last week spilled over convincingly and the pair acted it well, consistently and believably. Oddly, or perhaps brilliantly, Wilson only appears at the end and he brings a subtle, subconscious sense of relief to the climax of the episode which may not have been as effective if he had appeared all the way through.

This House M.D. episode contains unpleasant medical scene.

Links

House M.D. 6.05 Brave Heart (2009, Medical Black Comedy Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Lawrence Kaplow
Executive Producer: Hugh Laurie
Executive Producer: David Shore
Writer: Lawrence Kaplow
Director: Matt Shakman

House M.D. 6.05 Brave Heart (2009)

A policeman is admitted after a fall and his partner explains how he often takes unnecessary risks because he is convinced he is going to die at forty with a heart attack just like his father, grandfather and great-grandfather.

7/10

"One bowl of putrefied dad." An impressively gross highlight in a largely terrific episode which sees Chase not coping with the psychological fallout of taking someone’s life and House panicking that he may be losing his mind once more. Jesse Spencer turns in a blinder as he demands absolution from God. Other highlights include the autopsy with Omar Epps brilliant reaction shot, all the House / Wilson and House / Cuddy stuff and SPOILER"Differential diagnosis for resurrection. Go.". Medically the episode seemed typically suspect but fun.

This House M.D. episode contains adult dialogue and very gory and very unpleasant scenes and inferred masturbation.

Links

House M.D. 6.04 Instant Karma (2009, Medical Black Comedy Drama TV) – 7/10 review

Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
Lee Tergesen: Mr. Randall
Tanner Maguire: Jack Randall
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Greg Yaitanes
Executive Producer: Thomas L. Moran
Writer: Thomas L. Moran
Director: Greg Yaitanes

House M.D. 6.04 Instant Karma (2009)

With seventeen previous doctors having been unable to diagnose or treat his dying son, a billionaire insists that House take his case (despite House not having a medical licence, remember). House performs his usual diagnostic procedures and sets about taking the boy to the precipice of death before miraculously – oh… Perhaps money can’t buy everything.

7/10

In the House versus patient-of-the-week, versus Thirteen and versus Foreman / Chase, the result is two-one to House (I’m not saying which one he loses). While the shenanigans weren’t as funny or cunning as they have been and the medicine was, as usual, not terribly convincing, the balance of the episode made this feel largely sure-footed and House’s volunteering to deliver bad news is a welcome nod to his rehabilitation (no psychiatrist again this week). The Foreman / Chase storyline from last week spilled over convincingly and the pair acted it well, consistently and believably. Oddly, or perhaps brilliantly, Wilson only appears at the end and he brings a subtle, subconscious sense of relief to the climax of the episode which may not have been as effective if he had appeared all the way through.

This House M.D. episode contains unpleasant medical scene.

Links

House M.D. 6.03 The Tyrant (2009, Medical Black Comedy Drama TV) – 5/10 review

Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
James Earl Jones: President Dibala
David Marciano: Murphy
Garikayi Mutambirwa: Ruwe
Roger Aaron Brown: Joseph Ntila
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Peter Blake
Writer: Peter Blake
Director: David Straiton

House M.D. 6.03 Tyrant, The (2009)

An African dictator is admitted after violently coughing up blood but his harsh regime back home is testing the team’s duty to treat him impartially. Meanwhile, House has managed to irritate Wilson’s over-grumpy naighbour and his attempts to put things right do not go well. Nothing a bit of duct tape and drugs won’t sort out, naturally.

5/10

This episode opens with a nice surprise: I thought James Earl Jones was dead. He plays an "evil" dictator and sets up a moral dilemma for, particularly, Chase and Cameron as they are used by the writers to deliver two sides of the argument: to keep the doctors oath or not. The outcome is surprising and the episode thought-provoking but Jennifer Morrison and Jesse Spencer are such wishy-washy on-screen presences that they undermine their characters’ viewpoints and are simply blown away by James Earl Jones’ hurricane-force delivery. The writers have never liked Omar Epps and he keeps getting the short end of several sticks. House gets a better balance as he fights against his old misanthropic instincts and, as always, Hugh Laurie is perfect. Do they only write good lines for him or does he make ordinary lines awesome?

This House M.D. episode contains descriptions of violence and strong gory scenes.

Links

House M.D. 6.02 Epic Fail (2009, Medical Black Comedy Drama TV) – 6/10 review

Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Peter Jacobson: Dr. Chris Taub
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
Rick D. Wasserman:
Freda Foh Shen:
Andre Braugher: Dr. Darryl Nolan
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Supervising Producer: Liz Friedman
Co-Executive Producer: Greg Yaitanes
Writer: Sara Hess
Writer: Liz Friedman
Director: Greg Yaitanes

House M.D. 6.02 Epic Fail (2009)

House quits his job at Princeton aware that returning will likely lead him to undo all the progress he’s made. So he turns his attention to possible hobbies (apparently he doesn’t need money) to use as pain management for his leg. Meanwhile, Foreman demands House’s job even when Cuddy points out that House’s job only existed because House did it.

6/10

It never ceases to amaze me how poor the understanding of videogames is by television and movie creators. So here we have some unloved Nineties technology dressed up with a side order of daft future tech (such as facial expressions mirrored onto player avatars) used in the set-up to the patient-of-the-week and then later revisited as a hallucinogenic symptom. Foreman inherits House’s job when House decides not to return to the environment that got him into his current situation and immediately sets about taking the patient to the brink of death before hitting upon the medical solution. It’s easy to overlook, however, that the writers did allow Foreman to get the solution himself, legitimately, even though, as expected, SPOILER House had got there earlier that day just by looking at a posting on the internet. I am never convinced by grumpy Foreman – Omar Epps always seems to overplay that – but the relationship between him and Thirteen was nicer and more interesting than expected. Best bit was House boasting that he’d got a dog to pee in Wilson’s toilet which, however you slice it, is awesome.

Links