T.J. Hooker 3.21 Gang War (1984, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: [Officer Vince Romano]
Heather Locklear: [Officer Stacy Sheridan]
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Julie Carmen: Julia Mendez
Tony Plana: Chuy Vallestero
Marco Rodriguez: Julio Fuente
Sal Lopez: Luis Molina
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Sidney Ellis
Director: William Shatner
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.21 Gang War (1984)

Instrumental in getting two rival gangs to come together to talk peace, Hooker has to exert his authority and influence to keep the peace when someone tries to keep the gang war going.

5/10

As with most Shatner directed episodes, this is a bit weak but zips through the running time. This episode sees Hooker solve a gang war via car chases (good) but there is a giant hole in the plot (Maria must have seen her attacker but doesn’t say who it is and not out of fear or loyalty) which sticks out like a sore thumb as soon as it happens. Still, Hooker nearly throws a crim off a roof and tells us he ‘wants them bad,’ which is always good value, and Stacy gets to impotently jump into more scenes after they’ve finished than for a while.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.22 Deadlock (1984, Police Action Drama) – 8/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Dennis Lipscomb: Rawlins
Mike Gomez: Gomez
Clarence Williams III: Martin
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Bruce Shelly
Writer: David Ketchum
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.22 Deadlock (1984)

Hooker and Romano get trapped in a department store by a gang of ruthless robbers and their situation goes from bad to worse when Romano is badly injured and Hooker gets trapped in an elevator with the ringleader.

8/10

No car chases and just a single location but this is one of the best episodes as Hooker and Romano get trapped by three ruthless robbers in a department store. Hooker gets through another squad car which is, hilariously, SPOILER pinched by a couple of young vandals. The episode generates an impressive level of peril as Romano looks to be in serious trouble though Hooker does reassure the audience by calling the lead robber maggot. Hooker also gets trapped in an elevator with him and an empty gun and there’s no cheating to resolve things. Hooker hilariously (deliberately so) SPOILER fakes a nerve gas attack while SPOILER Richard Herd randomly turns up and blows one of the other robbers away. A classic.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, gory and unpleasant scenes.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.20 Psychic Terror (1984, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Marcy Lafferty: Julia Hudson
Paul Kent: Lt. Barton
Bruce Glover: Tony Aresco
Buck Taylor: Sam Rand
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: William Kelley
Director: Kenneth R. Koch
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.20 Psychic Terror (1984)

When a psychic is brought in to help with a child kidnapping, Hooker is rather more than sceptical despite her previous successes. She requests his assistance but doesn’t tell him why: she has foreseen his death…

5/10

Hooker spectacularly gets through another squad car which is always fun and, despite a psychic consultant storyline which is unconvincing at best, this is a solid episode which zips through the running time. Shatner’s wife Marcy Lafferty is the psychic in her second of four guest starring appearances on the show (as different characters). The climax borrows the telephone-to-telephone sequence from Dirty Harry.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.19 Death Strip (1984, Police Action Drama) – 4/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Thom Christopher: Paul Gavin
Nicholas Campbell: Toby Clark
Thalmus Rasulala: Lt. Craig Arkin
Joey Aresco: Sid Beamer
Sam Anderson: Leo Santee
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Patrick Mathews
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.19 Death Strip (1984)

As yet another narcotics bust goes wrong, this time with an informant getting killed, Hooker and his "brass band" go after the murderer, a man who wants to become a major player in drug trafficking and will stop at nothing.

4/10

Below par Hooker which reaches its lowest point when a stuntperson’s brown wig falls off during a stunt to expose long, flowing blond locks! Romano also gets in on the random skill reveal when, aside from being a stripper (which he does great until his trousers come off), he starts talking in sign language. Not be outdone, of course, Hooker starts talking in sign language later as well.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.18 Death on the Line (1984, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Kimberly Beck: Linda Stevens
Lynne Moody: Dr. Pamela Carter
John Dennis Johnston: Cliff Tanner
Jonathan Perpich: Dan Stevens
James Whitmore, Jr.: Frank Bryce
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.18 Death on the Line (1984)

When a robber and a rapist team up, it confuses the trail left for Hooker and co. but he soon sniffs the truth.

6/10

Solid episode which handles the serious topic of rape with due seriousness and balance but it’s all a little bit flat. This is probably due to the almost complete lack of pumping music during the action sequences. It also comes as something of a surprise when they don’t get Stacy into her underwear to pose as bait for the rapist. The final chase is well done, though, with the rapist running out of bullets correctly, then punching Hooker after being tackled (the traditional end of the chase). Hooker doesn’t seem too perturbed by this uncommon event, however, and throws him over the side of a pier into the sea and nearly bursts out laughing.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.17 Hot Property (1984, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Ray Wise: Harrison MacKenzie
Jason Evers:
Anne Lockhart:
Ed Bernard: Lieutenant Tom Reed
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Chester Krumholz
Director: Ric Rondell

T.J. Hooker 3.17 Hot Property (1984)

When a policeman is discovered dead at a drug bust, it seems that he may have been on the take but the supplier is successfully deflecting the efforts of honest cops to nail him (including getting Stacy suspended). Meanwhile, an ex-fiancee of Stacy’s returns to her life and this is not a coincidence.

6/10

Fun, though Hooker hilariously breaks the case by identifying a spent match! There’s a generous amount of good well-filmed stunt work and there are probably more bullets fired in this episode than the rest of the season put together. There’s even a bullet fired by Stacy. Just the one, mind you, despite her using an assault rifle. She also gets an expanded role without having to take her clothes off! Best stunt is probably two dudes jumping out of the way of a speeding car (it looks really close and the double personnel makes it extra dangerous) and most fun stunts are the climax when Hooker throws the baddie through what seems to be every wall in a warehouse ending up in a elevator shaft (Hooker: "Alright maggot, let’s go. We’re on the wrong floor.").

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.16 Hooker’s Run (1984, Police Action Drama) – 4/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: [Officer Vince Romano]
Heather Locklear: [Officer Stacy Sheridan]
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Shanna Reed: [Angie Quine]
Kaleena Kiff: [Mary Quine]
Alex Rocco: [Frank Dio]
Tom Atkins: [Phil Parker]
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Co-Producer: Simon Muntner
Writer: Simon Muntner
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.16 Hooker’s Run (1984)

A murderer’s former girlfriend could send him to prison with her testimony, but her death has been ordered and there is a leak in the department. Hooker knows he can trust Vince, Stacy and Jim but everyone else, including ex-army buddy and Detective in Charge Phil Parker, must be under suspicion.

4/10

Badly plotted and unenthusiastically, though pacily, directed. Asking James Darren to do more acting is always a bad idea as he consistently comes across as creepy, inappropriate or unconvincing. Brilliantly, he even suggests that another character get “personality lessons.” Still, his role moves aside after a while and the action is pretty tidy. There’s a good staircase chase and rooftop battle, a very good high fall, Hooker gets through another squad car and there’s an A-Team-inspired climax.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.15 Exercise in Murder (1984, Police Action Drama) – 8/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Judson Scott: Bobby Curtis
Tracy Scoggins: Jill Newmark
Robert Davi: Tom Warfield
James O’Sullivan: Internal Affairs
Greg Morris: Dave Reemer
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Co-Producer: Jack V. Fogarty
Co-Producer: Simon Muntner
Writer (Screenplay): Jack V. Fogarty
Writer (Screenplay): Simon Muntner
Writer (Story): Ed Waters
Director: Phil Bondelli
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.15 Exercise in Murder (1984)

Corrigan’s magically appearing girlfriend of “three or four months” (!), Jill, is inextricably involved with a gang pulling off armed jewel robberies while Hooker has to come to terms with shooting a small child.

8/10

This is classic Hooker with all the boxes ticked. The main crime plot is fine, there’s a car chase, both Hooker and Corrigan get personal stakes in the plot and an expanded role for Stacey means dancing in a leotard and a shower scene. The makers pull off a great scene early on when Hooker shoots a small child (or the technical term, as Internal Affairs later puts it, “blowing away the little sucker”). The scene is delivered without fanfare or build-up and just as any other part of the typical Hooker action sequence. They even have the kid go flying backwards into something just like if it was a bad guy. It was the perfect way to do it. I was eating cereal and it stopped me mid-munch in a did-they-just-do-that moment.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains adult dialogue and violence and sexuality.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.14 The Snow Game (1984, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Gary Lockwood:
Pepe Serna:
Jay Varela:
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Fred J. McKnight
Director: William Shatner
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.14 Snow Game, The (1984)

When a drug bust goes fatally wrong, then Romano gets shot, Hooker, Stacy and Corrigan go undercover to bring the perpetrators and their employers down.

5/10

Po-faced episode where everyone except Hooker is unconvincingly devastated (especially Corrigan, goodness he’s bad) after a fellow cop is assassinated. For a Shatner-directed episode, though, this is quite good. Unlike James Darren and Adrian Zmed, the man himself manages to pull off the determination and emotion required by the episode. The script isn’t terribly broken and he stages some good action sequences which have pace, shape and environmental interest. For instance, there is very good use of a helicopter in the opening action – especially for the sequence’s action punchline – while the bad guy gets a spectacular exit off a ship.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.13 The Lipstick Killer (1984, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
David Huffman: Dr. Don Travers
Katherine Justice: Joan Wagner
Hugh Farrington: Martin
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: David Ketchum
Writer: Robert Dennis
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Writer: Ed Waters
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.13 Lipstick Killer, The (1984)

When a nurse is bludgeoned to death with a blunt instrument it rings a bell from Hooker’s detective past. Assigned to assist, he soon discovers that it is a psychotic nurse who always kills one victim within 48 hours of the previous. It becomes a race against time as Hooker tries to close in on the killer that evaded him five years before.

5/10

Clearly inspired by Hitchcock (specifically Psycho and Vertigo) this is a humorously cheesy episode with a cringe-worthy story but strong action sequences. Hooker gets through another police car with a tidy car chase and agreeably huge explosion; later he performs a sweet dive and roll out of the way of a Porsche and that chase also sees the Porsche go spectacularly off the top of a multi-storey car park. The problem comes from the villain clearly being a dude from the outset (the story would have been better if the crimes hadn’t been shown) and villains in drag are not generally convincing in screen entertainment. The other problem is the horribly unconvincing and creepy ‘camaraderie’ of Corrigan towards Stacy which, of course, would only get more unconvincing and creepier. Gah!

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.12 Slay Ride (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Robert Dryer: Troy Eldridge
Philece Sampler: Sue Ann Eldridge
John McLiam: Father DeMarco
Marjoe Gortner: Marino
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Rick Husky
Director: Bruce Kessler
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.12 Slay Ride (1983)

While Hooker and Stacy are suffering from Christmas blues thanks to the prospect of spending the holiday period alone, they get involved in the case of a couple of armed robbers and their baby who they decide to abandon in a church.

6/10

Despite a very strong start featuring Hooker as Santa Claus executing a narcotics bust (arrest punchline: "Merry Christmas, punk!"), the story side of things gets progressively worse and even the car chases are rather underplayed. Refreshingly, Heather Locklear gets a storyline that doesn’t involve bikinis and impotently jumping into shot after an action scene finishes, Shatner gets a nice scene on the phone to his daughter, and there is still entertainment value to be had in the lead characters as they thoughtfully consider each other’s needs at Christmas time.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.11 Undercover Affair (1983, Police Action Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Barry Primus: Martin Colson
Simone Griffeth: Paige Miller
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Simon Muntner
Director: Charles Picerni
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.11 Undercover Affair (1983)

Hooker interferes with a FBI operation to take down a major drug supplier when people he knows on the street start getting hurt. Then he discovers that an old lover, Paige Miller, is deep undercover as the suppliers’ girlfriend and that is something he really doesn’t like.

7/10

Classic episode in which you are not supposed to notice that Hooker is clearly in the wrong for almost the entire time as he refuses to see the larger picture in the case of an international drug dealer. Good action, great scenery chewing from Shatner and a director who doesn’t underestimate the scenic value of bikini-clad babes in this series.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, unpleasasnt scenes.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.10 Blue Murder (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Grant Goodeve:
Jeana Tomasina: Gloria
Paul Burke:
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Paul B. Margolis
Director: Don Chaffey
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.10 Blue Murder (1983)

When a scumlord escapes punishment yet again, two cops decide to take things into their own hands and execute him. What will Hooker do when he discovers the truth?

6/10

This is still thoroughly entertaining but the plot is identical to SPOILER Clint Eastwood’s Dirty Harry sequel Magnum Force and it suffers in comparison. Special mention for the drug dealer’s fantastic car.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.08 Matter of Passion (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
John Vernon: Grant Chandler
Kristen Meadows:
Marc Alaimo: Ray Downing
Robert O’Reilly: Jack Riker
Lloyd Haynes: Lew Jensen
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Dick Nelson
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.09 Matter of Passion (1983)

When Hooker discovers the dead body of a beautiful young woman on the beach he determines to exact justice despite being unable to identify her.

6/10

It’s a bit more variable than most episodes with several strong sequences where things are taken far more slowly than is usual for the show. A dead girl’s hand grasping Hooker’s arm makes an impression as does quietly looking around her apartment when they eventually find it. However, the romantic angle is half-hearted (though bikini-heavy) and there are two notably naff sequences where the bad guys attempt to assassinate Hooker (the car bomb even uses recycled footage from an earlier episode, badly). As a bonus, Romano does manage to wear the worst funeral suit in television history.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, mild unpleasant scenes.

Links

T.J. Hooker S03E08 The Trial (1983) – 5/10 Police Action Courtroom Drama TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Lenore Kasdorf: Gina Canelli
Jeff Pomerantz: Briggs
Lee de Broux: Frank Abbott
Charles Dierkop: Doud
James Hong: Mr. Hong
Robert Hooks: Lt. Ellis
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Stephen Downing
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker S03E08 Trial, The (1983)

When Romano gets shot (again), he blames Gina Canelli, a young female officer who he and Canelli’s partner claim could have shot the suspect. Hooker agrees to defend Canelli at the trial much to Romano’s chagrin.

5/10

This is not a well-written episode as most things happen unconvincingly but necessarily for the plot to continue. Therefore, we have Hooker acting as a lawyer in a police tribunal and most of the dialogue and plot therein appears to have been written by somebody who watches Hollywood television trials as opposed to someone who is aware of the law. A couple of minutes after Hooker prevents a previous incident being brought up against his client, he brings up a previous incident against a witness, breaking him. The episode is well-paced and interesting, however, as there is friction between Hooker and Romano and, while there’s not enough time to squeeze in a full-size car chase, a baddie does drive around a corner and into a florists, and that’ll have to do.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence, mild gory and unpleasant scenes.

Links

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T.J. Hooker 3.07 A Child is Missing (1983, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano]
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan]
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Henry Darrow: Miguel Gomez
Steven Keats: David Burke
Barbara Horan: Paula Bennett
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Jack B. Sowards
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.07 Child is Missing, A (1983)

Hooker follows a child kidnapper all the way to Mexico.

5/10

This episode is a little let down by an unusually flat William Shatner and the unconvincing Hooker-strides-into-Mehico storyline. But we still get two car chases, several lovely ladies, Hooker thrown down a flight of stairs and an interesting climax that sees Hooker look like a thug because he isn’t wearing his uniform but is still behaving as though he is. As I was watching this episode, I kept thinking to myself how reminiscent the music was of Robert Zemeckis’ 1984 action hit Romancing the Stone. As it turns out, this episode was scored by Alan Silvestri, the composer on Romancing the Stone, exploring the Mexican rhythms he would employ the following year.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.06 Walk a Straight Line (1983, Police Alcoholism Action Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Vincent Baggetta: Sam Dietrich
Belinda J. Montgomery: Laura Dietrich
Ron Joseph: Lester Sayles
Mitch Carter:
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Rick Kelbaugh
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 3.06 Walk a Straight Line (1983)

When a stakeout goes terribly wrong, Corrigan suspects that one of the detectives involved has a drink problem. The detective is one of Hooker’s ex-partners and he agrees to have a word with him but more action may need to be taken. Meanwhile, the Jumpsuit gang are pulling off more and more dangerous armed robberies.

7/10

This is a good Hooker episode which bolts the dancing girls, car chases and ‘splosions onto a well-handled backbone tackling alcoholism. Hooker managed to get himself out of trouble after the break-up of his marriage so he is in a good position to help his friend. As is the case, the friend denies there is a problem and doesn’t respond to words. It often takes a brush with mortality to push an alcoholic into remedial action and the episode does a good job of portraying this arc and keeping it serious while still keeping the awesomeness of the remainder of the show. The chase sequences are good with quality punchlines. The first ends with a huge explosion and the second with Hooker leaping through the air and tipping himself and the baddie through a barrier into the sea. Cue classic moment when the bad guy sputters that he can’t swim. So Hooker retorts “Let me help you” and punches him in the noggin. The last chase has Hooker leaping on to the back of a speeding van. Hurrah!

This T.J. Hooker episode contains unpleasant scenes, mild violence.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.05 The Shadow of Truth (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Helen Shaver: Lisa Jericho
Nicolas Coster: Kevin Mundy
Luke Askew: Brad Thurman
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Robert Sherman
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 3.05 Shadow of Truth, The (1983)

Hooker’s latest girlfriend, investigative reporter Lisa Jericho, is rubbing the police department up the wrong way by exposing dodgy tactics employed by some but another target of her investigations is taking action: a contract is put out on her life.

6/10

Freqently solid fun, if credulity-stretching, with surprisingly few car chases but good chemistry between Shatner and Helen Shaver as his latest girlfriend. Hooker’s insanely wide-ranging knowledge this week includes geology and the ability to instantly analyse soil content just from picking it up. Oh, and he can bend the laws of space and time as he manages to drive down a hill, identify a man, work out what he’s doing there, run across a car park and leap across a car before the man can flip a switch. There is also plenty of bikini and girl-in-man’s-shirt (hurrah!) action to keep the less demanding male viewer entertained. The climax also features a bit of unintentional hilarity as Lisa Jericho looks aghast at the dead body of the baddie, then up at Hooker… who grins back at her. It’s so wrong, it’s awesome.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, unpleasant scenes.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.04 The Cheerleader Murder (1983, Police Action Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Joe Penny: Miles Dickson
James Luisi: George Laszlo
Katherine Justice: Joan Wagner
Jenny Sherman: Michelle
Dana Kimmell: Lisa Telford
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Gerald Sanford
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 3.04 Cheerleader Murder, The (1983)

Hooker gets involved in a teenage pornography ring when a beautiful cheerleader turns up dead full of drugs and having recently had an abortion.

7/10

Hooker tackles illegal teen pornography and drugs and Shatner rewards the viewer with the climactic line "Cuff him. Then wash your hands." Or in response to a teenage car thief’s excuse of ‘that was my Dad’s car’, Hooker almost subconsciously retorts "Put that to music." Awesome. We also get a couple of good car chases, Romano in a speedo, Stacey in a bikini (apparently, that’s how you cope with the trauma of unexpectedly finding a dead young girl), a monstrously good gay gag with Romano (Romano, shocked: "If anybody’s gonna pick me up, it’s gonna be someone in high heels and a miniskirt." Gay guy: "Don’t leave. I’ll be back.") and even a dance sequence for the Shat.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains adult dialogue.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.03 Chinatown (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
James Shigeta: Chow Duc Khan
Patricia Thomson: Nancy Ling Khan
Peter Brown: Lt. Drummer
Benson Fong: Lee Chan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Simon Muntner
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Director: Don Chaffey

T.J. Hooker 3.03 Chinatown (1983)

When Hooker gets involved in weapons smuggling in Chinatown it brings back memories from his first days as a beat officer.

6/10

Great fun with Shatner on top form as he finds out he may have a daughter. Richard Herd replacement Peter Brown (as Lt. Drummer) is dreadfully irritating but Adrian Zmed has a fun scene at Hooker’s motel room. Heather Locklear provokes unintentional laughter as she leaps into action scenes after they’re over and points her gun worthlessly though the blame lies with the producers. James Darren makes you wonder how he got the job as he has no charisma and no camaraderie with the other principle cast. James Shigeta is a decent baddie with his wonderfully smooth voice and even has a bat-cave.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.02 Carnal Express (1983, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Richard Lynch: Virgil Dobbs
Peter Brown: Lt. Drummer
Trisha Noble: Lorraine Daggett
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Joe Viola
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.

T.J. Hooker 3.02 Carnal Express (1983)

Hooker gets involved in a white slavery case but Stacey decides to go undercover as an exotic dancer to speed up the investigation.

5/10

While giving Heather Locklear more to do and less to wear may sound like the recipe for a great episode, she, like bland co-stars Adrian Zmed and James Darren, does not have the charisma or talent to carry the weight of the show. Richard Lynch is a quality bad guy at any time though and there’s still plenty of dirtbags for Hooker to chastise including a joyous epithet spat at Lynch. Also, Hooker on white slavery: "When they’re taken off my streets, like Bonnie, that’s different, and I’m damn well gonna put a stop to it." You know, if we ever cross T.J. Hooker and Valentino Rossi we should appoint him king of the world.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.01 The Return (1983, Police Action Drama) – 4/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
William Lucking: Jack Clayton
Laurie Prange: Elma Ford Prentiss
James Sutorius: Freddie Hamilton
Troas Hayes:
Marine Jahan: Evelyn West
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Mark Rodgers
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.

T.J. Hooker 3.01 Return, The (1983)

Five years after his detective partner was killed during an armed bank robbery, Hooker realises that the man responsible has returned (a one-handed man would you believe) and vows to get him while he can.

4/10

Mighty silly episode that takes itself way too seriously, though the chase sequences are helped no end by some energetic music.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence.

Links

T.J. Hooker: 2.22 Lady in Blue (1983, Police Action Drama) – 4/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Anne-Marie Martin: Officer Karen Hall
Leo Rossi: Tate
Justin Lord:
Roger Newman:
Percy Rodrigues: Jason
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Rick Husky
Director: William Shatner

T.J. Hooker 2.22 Lady in Blue (1983)

When Hooker’s gung-ho method of policing is imitated by a new female recruit, she is shot and badly injured (she loses a leg). Hooker blames himself and determines to get the maggots responsible.

4/10

Despite Shatner delivering a whole stack of "maggot" and "scum" speeches (a good thing), this is a horribly dated and rather unbalanced episode. Star Shatner can probably only blame himself: he directed this one.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.21 Payday Pirates (1983, Police Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
James Darren: Officer Jim Corrigan
Jean Leclerc: Jake Hendricks
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Paul B. Margolis
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.

T.J. Hooker 2.21 Payday Pirates (1983)

An armed robbery ends up with Fran getting hit on the head and suffering extensive damage to her optical nerve. As Fran struggles to keep her sight, Hooker struggles to reign in his rage as he relentlessly pursues the maggot responsible. Meanwhile, he assigns Stacy to in-the-field training with no-nonsense cop-with-a-past (of course, what other type of cop is there?) Jim Corrigan.

6/10

A guilty pleasure not to be taken too seriously and enjoyed with a silly grin on your face as Hooker deals with the maggots and scum that might render his wife blind. "If God’s gonna help somebody, it’s not likely to be you, friend." As usual for season two, there are is also a generous amount of good action with two car chases, a Hooker versus stock car showdown and Stacy executing a side-handle baton throw to take down a crook. New cast member James Darren tries to look annoyed with Heather Locklear but fails.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.02 King of the Hill (1982) – 6/10 police action drama TV review


Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
James Darren: “Devil” Dan Danko
Donna Wilkes: Karen Stewart
James O’Sullivan: Detective Wayne Conrad
Gary Graham: Jeff Simpson
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Stephen Downing
Director: Charles Picerni

T.J. Hooker 2.02 King of the Hill (1982)

When a hill racer wants to get enough money to build the fastest car he resorts to robbing supermarkets. Meanwhile, Romano is having a slightly masculine crisis about his driving abilities.

6/10

Wonderfully cheesy episode with a generous amount of humour, action and, most importantly, entertainment. Future series star James Darren pops up as a hill racer (“Devil” Dan Danko) with smudgy stubble and a sweet hat. And Shatner delivers not one but two of his wonderfully intense and straight-faced monologues about catching crims and remembering victims: “The maggots I’m looking for… they’re heavy and I want them.” More!

This T.J. Hooker episode contains unpleasant scene, violence.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

Links