House M.D. 6.16 Lockdown (2010, Drama) – 2/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Peter Jacobson: Dr. Chris Taub
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
David Strathairn: Nash
Neill Barry: Donald Lozinski
Riki Lindhome: Sarah Lozinski
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Eli Attie
Co-Executive Producer: Peter Blake
Executive Producer: Russel Friend
Executive Producer: Garrett Lerner
Executive Producer: David Shore
Writer (Screenplay): Russel Friend
Writer (Screenplay): Garrett Lerner
Writer (Screenplay): Peter Blake
Writer (Screenplay): Eli Attie
Writer (Story): Eli Attie
Writer (Story): Peter Blake
Director: Hugh Laurie

House M.D. 6.16 Lockdown (2010)

A baby disappears putting the hospital into lockdown. Wilson and Thirteen occupy themselves with a game of truth or dare. Taub and Foreman get high in Personnel. Chase and Cameron sign divorce papers. House winds up with a dying patient. Cuddy looks for the baby. The police and security team are probably useless at that kind of thing anyway.

2/10

One amazing House-ism is yer lot this week (he has fixed all his personnel records so that his malpractice suits were all brought by a patient named Lisa Cuddy). Everything else is indescribably awful.

This House M.D. episode contains adult dialogue and unpleasant and mild gory scenes and sexuality.

Links

House M.D. 6.07 Teamwork (2009, Medical Black Comedy Drama) – 4/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Peter Jacobson: Dr. Chris Taub
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
Michael Weston: Lucas Douglas
Jolene Blalock: Lexa
Troy Garity: Hank Hardwick
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Eli Attie
Executive Producer: Hugh Laurie
Executive Producer: David Shore
Writer: Eli Attie
Director: David Straiton

House M.D. 6.07 Teamwork (2009)

Patient-of-the-week is a porn star who collapses on the job. House gets his medical licence back but loses most of his team when Chase and Cameron announce they are going to leave.

4/10

House’s games this week feel extremely unconvincing as the writers settle things down for the remainder of the season. The patient-of-the-week is also given short thrift as House, apparently, knows what’s wrong with him early on but withholds the true diagnosis and treatment to tempt Taub and Thirteen back into the fold. The problem comes in that House’s games feel cruel and misleading as opposed to cunning and revealing. Cameron’s exit from the show is extraordinarily unconvincing but I have commented before that I don’t think the writers like Jennifer Morrison as her character has frequently borne the brunt of major character inconsistencies and half-hearted writing.

This House M.D. episode contains adult dialogue and unpleasant scenes and inferred sex scenes.

Links

House M.D. 6.06 Known Unknowns (2009, Medical Black Comedy Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Michael Weston: Lucas Douglas
Annabelle Attanasio: Jordan
Marcus Giamatti: Keener
Bianca Collins: Phoebe
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Doris Egan
Executive Producer: Hugh Laurie
Executive Producer: David Shore
Writer: Matthew V. Lewis
Writer: Doris Egan
Director: Greg Yaitanes

House M.D. 6.06 Known Unknowns (2009)

House attends a medical conference when he learns that Cuddy and her breasts (Patty and Selma, always smoking) are going but his patient-of-the-week – a young girl with swollen joints and extreme muscle fatigue – keeps requiring his long-distance attention.

6/10

House is on good form with Wilson and Cuddy this week (though don’t try naming your boss’s breasts at home, children; unless you’re a maverick genius, of course) though the patient-of-the-week diagnostic procedures are as unconvincing as ever and there is an unwelcome return for House’s Mini-Me Lucas Douglas (Michael Weston). The episode is again presenting the weight on the conscience of the doctor as arbiter of life and death with Chase having killed someone who wouldn’t have died and Wilson allowing a terminal patient to die early. I’m of the opinion, though, that doctors unnecessarily extend life beyond what the body would naturally allow through their use of intravenous feeds and respirators and the like. Without those things, the patient would die of their own accord much sooner. With those things, the doctors stop them dying but make their life painful, frustrating, humiliating and debilitated. If such forcible life-extending devices were not used for people who have terminal conditions, the number of cases warranting contemplation of euthanasia would, I suspect, plunge dramatically.

This House M.D. episode contains adult dialogue, references to substance abuse and unpleasant scenes.

Links

House M.D. 6.04 Instant Karma (2009, Medical Black Comedy Drama TV) – 7/10 review

Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
Lee Tergesen: Mr. Randall
Tanner Maguire: Jack Randall
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Greg Yaitanes
Executive Producer: Thomas L. Moran
Writer: Thomas L. Moran
Director: Greg Yaitanes

House M.D. 6.04 Instant Karma (2009)

With seventeen previous doctors having been unable to diagnose or treat his dying son, a billionaire insists that House take his case (despite House not having a medical licence, remember). House performs his usual diagnostic procedures and sets about taking the boy to the precipice of death before miraculously – oh… Perhaps money can’t buy everything.

7/10

In the House versus patient-of-the-week, versus Thirteen and versus Foreman / Chase, the result is two-one to House (I’m not saying which one he loses). While the shenanigans weren’t as funny or cunning as they have been and the medicine was, as usual, not terribly convincing, the balance of the episode made this feel largely sure-footed and House’s volunteering to deliver bad news is a welcome nod to his rehabilitation (no psychiatrist again this week). The Foreman / Chase storyline from last week spilled over convincingly and the pair acted it well, consistently and believably. Oddly, or perhaps brilliantly, Wilson only appears at the end and he brings a subtle, subconscious sense of relief to the climax of the episode which may not have been as effective if he had appeared all the way through.

This House M.D. episode contains unpleasant medical scene.

Links

House M.D. 6.05 Brave Heart (2009, Medical Black Comedy Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Lawrence Kaplow
Executive Producer: Hugh Laurie
Executive Producer: David Shore
Writer: Lawrence Kaplow
Director: Matt Shakman

House M.D. 6.05 Brave Heart (2009)

A policeman is admitted after a fall and his partner explains how he often takes unnecessary risks because he is convinced he is going to die at forty with a heart attack just like his father, grandfather and great-grandfather.

7/10

"One bowl of putrefied dad." An impressively gross highlight in a largely terrific episode which sees Chase not coping with the psychological fallout of taking someone’s life and House panicking that he may be losing his mind once more. Jesse Spencer turns in a blinder as he demands absolution from God. Other highlights include the autopsy with Omar Epps brilliant reaction shot, all the House / Wilson and House / Cuddy stuff and SPOILER"Differential diagnosis for resurrection. Go.". Medically the episode seemed typically suspect but fun.

This House M.D. episode contains adult dialogue and very gory and very unpleasant scenes and inferred masturbation.

Links

House M.D. 6.04 Instant Karma (2009, Medical Black Comedy Drama TV) – 7/10 review

Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
Lee Tergesen: Mr. Randall
Tanner Maguire: Jack Randall
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Greg Yaitanes
Executive Producer: Thomas L. Moran
Writer: Thomas L. Moran
Director: Greg Yaitanes

House M.D. 6.04 Instant Karma (2009)

With seventeen previous doctors having been unable to diagnose or treat his dying son, a billionaire insists that House take his case (despite House not having a medical licence, remember). House performs his usual diagnostic procedures and sets about taking the boy to the precipice of death before miraculously – oh… Perhaps money can’t buy everything.

7/10

In the House versus patient-of-the-week, versus Thirteen and versus Foreman / Chase, the result is two-one to House (I’m not saying which one he loses). While the shenanigans weren’t as funny or cunning as they have been and the medicine was, as usual, not terribly convincing, the balance of the episode made this feel largely sure-footed and House’s volunteering to deliver bad news is a welcome nod to his rehabilitation (no psychiatrist again this week). The Foreman / Chase storyline from last week spilled over convincingly and the pair acted it well, consistently and believably. Oddly, or perhaps brilliantly, Wilson only appears at the end and he brings a subtle, subconscious sense of relief to the climax of the episode which may not have been as effective if he had appeared all the way through.

This House M.D. episode contains unpleasant medical scene.

Links

House M.D. 6.03 The Tyrant (2009, Medical Black Comedy Drama TV) – 5/10 review

Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
James Earl Jones: President Dibala
David Marciano: Murphy
Garikayi Mutambirwa: Ruwe
Roger Aaron Brown: Joseph Ntila
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Peter Blake
Writer: Peter Blake
Director: David Straiton

House M.D. 6.03 Tyrant, The (2009)

An African dictator is admitted after violently coughing up blood but his harsh regime back home is testing the team’s duty to treat him impartially. Meanwhile, House has managed to irritate Wilson’s over-grumpy naighbour and his attempts to put things right do not go well. Nothing a bit of duct tape and drugs won’t sort out, naturally.

5/10

This episode opens with a nice surprise: I thought James Earl Jones was dead. He plays an "evil" dictator and sets up a moral dilemma for, particularly, Chase and Cameron as they are used by the writers to deliver two sides of the argument: to keep the doctors oath or not. The outcome is surprising and the episode thought-provoking but Jennifer Morrison and Jesse Spencer are such wishy-washy on-screen presences that they undermine their characters’ viewpoints and are simply blown away by James Earl Jones’ hurricane-force delivery. The writers have never liked Omar Epps and he keeps getting the short end of several sticks. House gets a better balance as he fights against his old misanthropic instincts and, as always, Hugh Laurie is perfect. Do they only write good lines for him or does he make ordinary lines awesome?

This House M.D. episode contains descriptions of violence and strong gory scenes.

Links