Lie To Me 1.13 Sacrifice (2009, TV) – 7/10 review

Cast / crew
Tim Roth: Dr. Cal Lightman
Kelli Williams: Dr. Gillian Foster
Brendan Hines: Eli Loker
Monica Raymund: Ria Torres
Creator: Samuel Baum
Mekhi Phifer:
Sean Patrick Thomas:
Molly Price:
Jonathan Banks:
Hayley McFarland: Emily Lightman
Anthony Azizi:
Bernard White:
Jennifer Beals: Zoe Landau
Supervising Producer: Josh Singer
Co-Executive Producer: Dustin Thomason
Co-Executive Producer: Adam Davidson
Writer: Josh Singer
Writer: Dustin Thomason
Director: Adam Davidson

Lie To Me 1.13 Sacrifice (2009)

The FBI use Lightman when a suicide bombing destroys a bus full of passengers.

7/10

Of course it would be marvellous if all suicide bombings could be cleared up inside a day but that’s the nature of television dramas and the story is interesting and unpredictable enough to close Lie To Me on a high. The episode title Sacrifice gets one worried that the writers had run out of ideas and would be killing off one of our heroes but, refreshingly, that’s not the case. The sacrifice comes in the form of the comic book cliché “with these powers, I shall become a superhero” and the famous Star Trek quote: “The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few. Or the one.” Lie To Me has proved to be an entertaining and interesting new show and I look forward to a second season.

This Lie To Me episode contains unpleasant scenes.

Links

Lie To Me 1.10 Better Half (2009, TV) – 7/10 review

Tim Roth: Dr. Cal Lightman
Kelli Williams: Dr. Gillian Foster
Brendan Hines: Eli Loker
Monica Raymund: Ria Torres
Writer (Creator): Samuel Baum
David Harbour:
Mireille Enos:
Hayley McFarland: Emily Lightman
Kurt Caceres:
Karis Campbell:
Jennifer Beals: Zoe Landau
Supervising Producer: Josh Singer
Writer: Ilana Bar-Din Giannini
Writer: Josh Singer
Director: Karen Gaviola

Lie To Me 1.10 Better Half (2009)

Lightman’s expertise is called upon by his ex-wife Zoe Landau (some sort of state attorney) in the case of an arson where a child was injured and a grandmother died. Another child claims he saw a TV reporter start the fire but while Lightman doesn’t think he is lying, he doesn’t think he is telling the truth either.

7/10

Though this is directed without pace and feels much longer than it should, there is more than enough plot turns to keep things interesting. Jennifer Beals turns up as Lightman’s ex-wife and bears an uncanny resemblance to on-screen daughter Hayley McFarland; from looks alone you could easily believe them to be related.

Lie To Me 1.05 Unchained (2009, TV) – 6/10 review

Tim Roth: Dr. Cal Lightman
Kelli Williams: Dr. Gillian Foster
Brendan Hines: Eli Loker
Monica Raymund: Ria Torres
Writer (Creator): Samuel Baum
Paul Calderon:
Deirdre Lovejoy:
Brad Beyer:
Brett Rice:
Matt Bushell:
Troy Winbush:
Ross Thomas:
Supervising Producer: Josh Singer
Writer: Josh Singer
Director: Lesli Linka Glatter

Lie To Me 1.05 Unchained (2009)

Lightman tries to assess whether an incarcerated gang leader has truly reformed. Dr. Foster looks into the death of a fireman.

6/10

While not a terribly good episode with transparent storylines lagging behind audience perception, Tim Roth does get to munch a burger in someone’s face and the climax involving the is-he-or-isn’t-he-reformed gangster works emotionally.

Links

Lie To Me 1.02 Moral Waiver (2009, TV) – 6/10 review

Tim Roth: Dr. Cal Lightman
Kelli Williams: Dr. Gillian Foster
Brendan Hines: Eli Loker
Monica Raymund: Ria Torres
Writer (Creator): Samuel Baum
Charles Parnell:
David Anders: Staff Sergeant Russell Scott
Supervising Producer: Josh Singer
Co-Executive Producer: Adam Davidson
Writer: Josh Singer
Director: Adam Davidson

Lie To Me 1.02 Moral Waiver (2009)

After debunking the latest polygraph with an egg and a babe, Lightman is requested to determine whether a female soldier who has accused her sergeant of rape is telling the truth or not. Dr. Foster investigates a charge of bribery against a high-school basketball player who is due to turn pro at the end of the year.

6/10

The information on micro-expressions and body language is fascinating, as are the real-world examples of such; fascinating enough to paper over the frustratingly routine framework and characterisation and clumsy portrayal of the micro-expressions and body language. That won’t last, however, so Lie To Me needs to add guile and subtlety to give it legs. It also seems anachronistic of Lightman to dismiss polygraph tests while his associate uses voice stress analysis (which has the exact same weakness) to help with the second case-of-the-week.

Links