In Time (2011) – 6/10 science-fiction on-the-run thriller movie review

Cast / crew
Writer, Producer and Director: Andrew Niccol
Producer: Eric Newman
Producer: Marc Abraham
Amanda Seyfried: Sylvia Weis
Justin Timberlake: Will Salas
Cillian Murphy: Raymond Leon
Vincent Kartheiser: Philippe Weis
Olivia Wilde: Rachel Salas
Matthew Bomer: Henry Hamilton
Johnny Galecki: Borel
Collins Pennie: Timekeeper Jaeger
Alex Pettyfer: Fortis

In Time (2011)

Everyone is genetically engineered to stop aging at 25 at which point you are given 1 year on your personal clock. When your time runs out, you die. Fortunately, you can earn more time but Will Salas is about to come into a century of time that will change his life. Maybe forever.

6/10

While it’s pacy and entertaining enough, this movie is still something of a failure. But it’s the kind of failure I want to watch and see more of. It takes an interesting concept and worthwhile topics and attempts to fold them into an on-the-run thriller but a lack of coherence (getting the plot from kidnapping Weis to Bonnie and Clyde feels like a cludge) and an ineffectiveness at explaining why our heroes actions are to be seen as good (they deliberately cause a global financial crisis – something that wasn’t too well received in the real world in 2008) mean that its welcome ambition isn’t quite realised.

This movie contains a single sexual swear just to make sure it’s a 12a / pg13, adult dialogue and violence and sexuality.

Classified 12A by BBFC. Persons under the age of 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

The Next Three Days (2010) – 7/10 prison escape thriller movie review

Cast / crew
Director: Paul Haggis
Writer (Screenplay): Paul Haggis
Producer: Michael Nozik
Producer: Paul Haggis
Producer: Olivier Delbosc
Producer: Marc Missonnier
Russell Crowe: John Brennan
Elizabeth Banks: Lara Brennan
Brian Dennehy: George Brennan
Lennie James: Lieutenant Nabulsi
Olivia Wilde: Nicole
Ty Simpkins: Luke
Helen Carey: Grace Brennan
Liam Neeson: Damon Pennington
Director (Original Film) Pour Elle: Fred Cavayé
Writer (Original Screenplay) Pour Elle: Fred Cavayé
Writer (Original Screenplay) Pour Elle: Guillaume Lemans

The Next Three Days (2010)

After running out of legal options and in the face of significant evidence, a husband who believes in his wife’s innocence of murdering her boss desperately starts to formulate an escape plan.

7/10

While it doesn’t seem to have much depth, this refreshingly straight-forward prison escape movie does take it’s subject rather more seriously than most and easily keeps your attention throughout. It works hard to ground the film in reality and makes the intriguing decision to largely portray Crowe’s wife as abrasive and probably guilty. When it gets to the escape itself, it remains fairly grounded, especially when portraying law enforcement agencies as organised and intelligent. Russell Crowe is fat but good and easily carries the movie. Everyone else does their bit and writer / director Paul Haggis keeps it moving smoothly. However, despite all the high quality work on show, iIt’s probably really important not to look too closely afterward.

This movie contains a single sexual swear word, adult dialogue and violence and sensuality.

Classified 12A by BBFC. Persons under the age of 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

House M.D. 6.19 The Choice (2010, Black Comedy Medical Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Peter Jacobson: Dr. Chris Taub
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
Cynthia Watros: Sam Carr
Adam Garcia: Ted
Eva Amurri: Nicole
Jennifer Crystal Foley: Rachel Taub
Jonathan Murphy: Cotter Macklin
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Supervising Producer: David Hoselton
Supervising Producer: David Foster
Executive Producer: Hugh Laurie
Writer: David Hoselton
Director: Juan J. Campanella

House M.D. 6.19 Choice, The (2010)

A man collapses speechless at the altar before he can say ‘I do’ but his symptoms miraculously clear up in House’s presence at the end of a sharp pointy needle. House team take it in turns to ask their boss out for the evening while House attempts to get Taub back into his marriage.

6/10

There’s fun in this episode but the conceit that homosexuality cannot be circumvented when you’re born with it and must be allowed it’s free expression seems foolish. Does this mean that a sociopath must be allowed to kill? That a person with any inescapable predilection should be allowed, even encouraged, to follow through? That said, the fact that the episode has broached this intriguing issue again is worthy. It always strikes me as fascinating that homosexuality is largely labelled in contemporary drama as uncontrollable and genetic. If it is, and you believe that evolution and genetics are the only key to all life, then aren’t homosexuals evolutionarily redundant, at best, a way of depopulating the planet? That aspect is never mentioned…

Links

House M.D. 6.18 Open and Shut (2010, Black Comedy Medical Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Peter Jacobson: Dr. Chris Taub
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
Cynthia Watros: Sam Carr
Sarah Wayne Callies: Julia
Rob Evors: Tom
Jennifer Crystal Foley: Rachel Taub
Charlie Weber: Damien
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Supervising Producer: Liz Friedman
Co-Executive Producer: Greg Yaitanes
Executive Producer: Hugh Laurie
Executive Producer: David Shore
Writer: Sara Hess
Writer: Liz Friedman
Director: Greg Yaitanes

House M.D. 6.18 Open and Shut (2010)

House, in the exact opposite of what he said last week, is trying to push Wilson and Sam to make-or-break their relationship. Patient-of-the-week has a functioning open marriage which intrigues House and miffs / gives ideas to a temptation-baiting Taub who is currently sniffing around another affair.

6/10

Some vaguely interesting stuff about relationships this week as the patient has an open marriage, Taub wants an open marriage and Wilson’s relationship with his ex-wife is about to hit it’s first pothole. The drama is thought-provoking if you want it to be and is much better than the worthless medical element which is as unconvincing as it always is now. The medical dramas need to be scaled back; they are always so ridiculously life-threatening as to remove any sense of drama and the circuitous diagnoses are poorly explained to the audience. House and his team may as well be ‘rhubarb’-ing around the conference table.

This House M.D. episode contains strong adult dialogue and unpleasant and gory scenes and sexuality.

Links

House M.D. 6.17 Knight Fall (2010, Black Comedy Medical Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Peter Jacobson: Dr. Chris Taub
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
Michael Weston: Lucas Douglas
Cynthia Watros: Sam Carr
Noah Segan: William
Sarah Jones: Shannon
Wes Ramsey: Miles
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Executive Producer: Hugh Laurie
Executive Producer: David Shore
Writer: John C. Kelley
Director: Juan J. Campanella

House M.D. 6.17 Knight Fall (2010)

House looks into the case of a knight who collapses after a duel but finds himself distracted when Wilson starts reconciling with his first ex-wife.

6/10

After last week’s dismal episode, this is a return to normal service and introduces a couple of new story threads to take us through to the end of the season: Wilson’s rekindling of romance with a ex-wife and a worsening of pain for House. Story-wise the episode presents, more interestingly than usual for drama, a selfish sexual morality. Our patient-of-the-week has chosen not to declare his love to his friend’s fiancée because it’s not right and he considers his friend to be better for her than him. Thirteen tells him he’s an idiot and that he should tell the girl and break up the relationship. What’s interesting is that Thirteen’s character is so blunt about this that her opinon, the usual selfish moral standard presented in entertainment dramas as the actions of the hero, become transparently selfish and somewhat distasteful. Though, perhaps, if you are someone who considers that we should ‘follow our heart,’ i.e., be selfish, you may not see it that way.

This House M.D. episode contains bad language, adult dialogue and unpleasant scenes and inferred nudity.

Links

House M.D. 6.16 Lockdown (2010, Drama) – 2/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jennifer Morrison: Dr. Allison Cameron
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Peter Jacobson: Dr. Chris Taub
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
David Strathairn: Nash
Neill Barry: Donald Lozinski
Riki Lindhome: Sarah Lozinski
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Eli Attie
Co-Executive Producer: Peter Blake
Executive Producer: Russel Friend
Executive Producer: Garrett Lerner
Executive Producer: David Shore
Writer (Screenplay): Russel Friend
Writer (Screenplay): Garrett Lerner
Writer (Screenplay): Peter Blake
Writer (Screenplay): Eli Attie
Writer (Story): Eli Attie
Writer (Story): Peter Blake
Director: Hugh Laurie

House M.D. 6.16 Lockdown (2010)

A baby disappears putting the hospital into lockdown. Wilson and Thirteen occupy themselves with a game of truth or dare. Taub and Foreman get high in Personnel. Chase and Cameron sign divorce papers. House winds up with a dying patient. Cuddy looks for the baby. The police and security team are probably useless at that kind of thing anyway.

2/10

One amazing House-ism is yer lot this week (he has fixed all his personnel records so that his malpractice suits were all brought by a patient named Lisa Cuddy). Everything else is indescribably awful.

This House M.D. episode contains adult dialogue and unpleasant and mild gory scenes and sexuality.

Links

House M.D., 6.15 Black Hole (2010, Black Comedy Medical Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
Hugh Laurie: Dr. Gregory House
Lisa Edelstein: Dr. Lisa Cuddy
Omar Epps: Dr. Eric Foreman
Robert Sean Leonard: Dr. James Wilson
Jesse Spencer: Dr. Robert Chase
Creator: David Shore
Peter Jacobson: Dr. Chris Taub
Olivia Wilde: Thirteen
Cali Fredrichs: Abby Nash
Nick Eversman: Nick
Dennis Boutsikaris: Artie
Jennifer Crystal Foley: Rachel Taub
Sunil Malhotra: Mr. Damon
Producer: Marcy G. Kaplan
Producer: Sara Hess
Co-Executive Producer: Lawrence Kaplow
Co-Executive Producer: Greg Yaitanes
Executive Producer: Hugh Laurie
Executive Producer: David Shore
Writer: Lawrence Kaplow
Director: Greg Yaitanes

House M.D. 6.15 Black Hole (2010)

House insists that their apartment’s lack of furniture says something about Wilson. Meanwhile, he treats a young woman who’s symptoms leave him and the team completely stumped.

5/10

A poor episode with a director trying to cover a seriously unconvincing and thin story with flash special effects (!) while the back-up plots of Taub’s marriage and furniture in Wilson’s apartment are not as fun or sharp as they have been.

This House M.D. episode contains adult dialogue and gory and unpleasant scenes.

Links