T.J. Hooker 2.01 Second Chance (1982) – 6/10 police action drama TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Rebecca Holden: Lynn Hartmann
Robert Davi: The Barber
Victor Campos:
Al Ruscio:
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Mark Rodgers
Director: Don Weis
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 2.01 Second Chance (1982)

An old unsolved case from Hooker’s past returns to terrorise a local dance teacher.

6/10

The slightly naff start of the second series sees April Clough replaced with even lovelier Heather Locklear and William Shatner replaced rather too often by his stunt ‘double’. However, the stunt work itself is of a high quality as Hooker writes off another squad car ("Well, it did have more than a thousand miles on it.") spectacularly enough to make the title sequence.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains peril.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

Continue reading “T.J. Hooker 2.01 Second Chance (1982) – 6/10 police action drama TV review”

T.J. Hooker 3.05 The Shadow of Truth (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Helen Shaver: Lisa Jericho
Nicolas Coster: Kevin Mundy
Luke Askew: Brad Thurman
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Robert Sherman
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 3.05 Shadow of Truth, The (1983)

Hooker’s latest girlfriend, investigative reporter Lisa Jericho, is rubbing the police department up the wrong way by exposing dodgy tactics employed by some but another target of her investigations is taking action: a contract is put out on her life.

6/10

Freqently solid fun, if credulity-stretching, with surprisingly few car chases but good chemistry between Shatner and Helen Shaver as his latest girlfriend. Hooker’s insanely wide-ranging knowledge this week includes geology and the ability to instantly analyse soil content just from picking it up. Oh, and he can bend the laws of space and time as he manages to drive down a hill, identify a man, work out what he’s doing there, run across a car park and leap across a car before the man can flip a switch. There is also plenty of bikini and girl-in-man’s-shirt (hurrah!) action to keep the less demanding male viewer entertained. The climax also features a bit of unintentional hilarity as Lisa Jericho looks aghast at the dead body of the baddie, then up at Hooker… who grins back at her. It’s so wrong, it’s awesome.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, unpleasant scenes.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.04 The Cheerleader Murder (1983, Police Action Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Joe Penny: Miles Dickson
James Luisi: George Laszlo
Katherine Justice: Joan Wagner
Jenny Sherman: Michelle
Dana Kimmell: Lisa Telford
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Gerald Sanford
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 3.04 Cheerleader Murder, The (1983)

Hooker gets involved in a teenage pornography ring when a beautiful cheerleader turns up dead full of drugs and having recently had an abortion.

7/10

Hooker tackles illegal teen pornography and drugs and Shatner rewards the viewer with the climactic line "Cuff him. Then wash your hands." Or in response to a teenage car thief’s excuse of ‘that was my Dad’s car’, Hooker almost subconsciously retorts "Put that to music." Awesome. We also get a couple of good car chases, Romano in a speedo, Stacey in a bikini (apparently, that’s how you cope with the trauma of unexpectedly finding a dead young girl), a monstrously good gay gag with Romano (Romano, shocked: "If anybody’s gonna pick me up, it’s gonna be someone in high heels and a miniskirt." Gay guy: "Don’t leave. I’ll be back.") and even a dance sequence for the Shat.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains adult dialogue.

Links

T.J. Hooker 1.05 The Witness (1982) – 6/10 police action drama TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
April Clough: Officer Victoria Taylor
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Lisa Hartman: Alison Baker
Jonathan Banks: Danny Scott
Michael O’Hare: Cal Jastrow
Robert Hogan: Neil Stoner
Michael Pataki: Nick
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Gerald Sanford
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 1.05 Witness, The (1982)

Hooker and Romano respond to a murder committed during a robbery but a witness to the crime proves unresponsive.

6/10

Plenty of action, Shatner being a hero and endlessly leaping off stuff onto bad guys (“the nose knows, junior”), a bit of humour and the lovely Lisa Hartman in shorts: what more could one want? Special mention for the scene in the opening car chase where you can see the camera crew filming the action as Hooker and the pursuee enter the storm drain. If you missed it, don’t worry, the producers would use the same footage several times during the next five years.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence, strong threat.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.03 Chinatown (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
James Shigeta: Chow Duc Khan
Patricia Thomson: Nancy Ling Khan
Peter Brown: Lt. Drummer
Benson Fong: Lee Chan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Simon Muntner
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Director: Don Chaffey

T.J. Hooker 3.03 Chinatown (1983)

When Hooker gets involved in weapons smuggling in Chinatown it brings back memories from his first days as a beat officer.

6/10

Great fun with Shatner on top form as he finds out he may have a daughter. Richard Herd replacement Peter Brown (as Lt. Drummer) is dreadfully irritating but Adrian Zmed has a fun scene at Hooker’s motel room. Heather Locklear provokes unintentional laughter as she leaps into action scenes after they’re over and points her gun worthlessly though the blame lies with the producers. James Darren makes you wonder how he got the job as he has no charisma and no camaraderie with the other principle cast. James Shigeta is a decent baddie with his wonderfully smooth voice and even has a bat-cave.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.02 Carnal Express (1983, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Richard Lynch: Virgil Dobbs
Peter Brown: Lt. Drummer
Trisha Noble: Lorraine Daggett
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Joe Viola
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.

T.J. Hooker 3.02 Carnal Express (1983)

Hooker gets involved in a white slavery case but Stacey decides to go undercover as an exotic dancer to speed up the investigation.

5/10

While giving Heather Locklear more to do and less to wear may sound like the recipe for a great episode, she, like bland co-stars Adrian Zmed and James Darren, does not have the charisma or talent to carry the weight of the show. Richard Lynch is a quality bad guy at any time though and there’s still plenty of dirtbags for Hooker to chastise including a joyous epithet spat at Lynch. Also, Hooker on white slavery: "When they’re taken off my streets, like Bonnie, that’s different, and I’m damn well gonna put a stop to it." You know, if we ever cross T.J. Hooker and Valentino Rossi we should appoint him king of the world.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.07 The Survival Syndrome (1982, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review


Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Robert Fields: Lawson
Chris Mulkey: Thomas
Mark Soper: David Harmon
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Dallas Barnes
Writer: Joanne Barnes
Director: Charles Picerni

T.J. Hooker 2.07 Survival Syndrome, The (1982)

After Romano is shot in the head by car thieves (fortunately, it just misses his hair), Hooker comes under close personal scrutiny from the media when he is filmed apparently shooting the unarmed teenage criminal who was shouting “Don’t shoot! Don’t shoot!”. Hooker and Captain Sheridan know that it was the thief’s accomplice that shot him but until the bullet can be delicately removed from the teenager’s spine, they will have no proof.

6/10

Fast-moving (there are three plot strands) and entertaining but too much strain is placed on Adrian Zmed’s acting ability. Still, we get a great scene where Hooker sorts out Romano’s posttraumatic stress disorder (here called survival syndrome) by wrestling with him (obviously, the best way to sort out any anxiety disorder) and there’s a welcome car chase in the middle. You don’t get many car chases in cop shows nowadays and I miss them.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

Links