Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991) – 8/10 science-fiction action adventure movie review

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Cast / crew
For: Gene Roddenberry
Director and Screenplay Writer: Nicholas Meyer
Kirk: William Shatner
Spock: Leonard Nimoy
DeForest Kelley: McCoy
James Doohan: Scotty
Walter Koenig: Chekov
Nichelle Nichols: Uhuru
George Takei: Sulu
Mark Lenard: Sarek
David Warner: Chancellor Gorkon
Kim Cattrall: Lt. Valeris
Rosana DeSoto: Azetbur
Christopher Plummer: Chang
Dedicated To and Original Series Creator STAR TREK: Gene Roddenberry
Story Writer: Lawrence Konner
Story Writer: Mark Rosenthal
Actor, Executive Producer and Story Writer: Leonard Nimoy
Screenplay Writer: Denny Martin Flinn
Producer: Ralph Winter
Producer: Steven-Charles Jaffe

Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991)

When a disaster on Praxis, an important energy-producing moon, faces the Klingon race with the choice of military expenditure or survival as a species, they call to the Federation to arrange a peace. Three months from retirement, Captain James T. Kirk and the crew of the Enterprise are sent as a figurative olive branch to escort the Klingon Ambassador to Earth. After a less-than-successful diplomatic meal aboard the Enterprise, Kirk is rudely awoken by the sound of Enterprise firing on the Ambassador’s ship and his subsequent assassination. In the absence of the actual killers, Kirk and McCoy are arrested and put on trial.

8/10

"Nice to see you in action, one more time, Captain Kirk." – Captain Sulu

In what must be a unique cinematic event, the original Star Trek cast literally sign off from their motion picture series and must have been deservedly proud that it was done with this spectacular and interesting, generally well paced and smart movie. Boasting social commentary, courtroom drama, murder mystery intrigue, one of the greatest beards in movie history (Kurtwood Smith), a prison escape, a dude who doesn’t have knees where his knees are and a classic space battle resolved with intellect (and a lot of photon torpedoes, admittedly), The Undiscovered Country is a terrific movie with a lot to like. Not included in that list would be Kim Cattrall who threatens to undermine everything with her lack of acting ability. Generally, though, the movie is handled surely by Wrath of Khan director Nicholas Meyer and is headlined by wonderful work from William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy. It certainly was nice to see them in action one more time.

This movie contains graphic violence, gory scenes, unpleasant scenes

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

Star Trek: Generations (1994) – 7/10 science fiction action adventure movie review

Cast / crew
Patrick Stewart: Picard
Jonathan Frakes: Riker
Brent Spiner: Data
LeVar Burton: Geordi
Michael Dorn: Worf
Gates McFadden: Beverly
Marina Sirtis: Troi
Malcolm McDowell: Soran
James Doohan: Scotty
Walter Koenig: Chekov
William Shatner: Captain James T. Kirk
Writer (Original Series’ Creator) Star Trek: Gene Roddenberry
Writer (Story): Rick Berman
Writer (Story): Ronald D. Moore
Writer (Story): Brannon Braga
Writer (Screenplay): Ronald D. Moore
Writer (Screenplay): Brannon Braga
Producer: Rick Berman
Director: David Carson

Star Trek: Generations (1994)

Eighty years after surviving an energy ribbon that claimed the life of Captain Kirk aboard the USS Enterprise B, Soran gets involved with the current Enterprise and her crew when the observatory he is working on is attacked by Romulans.

7/10

The Next Generation‘s first big-screen outing is good but a little unsatisfactory; especially on repeat viewings. First time around, though, this is a spectacular, science-fiction with at least one edge-of-the-seat scene with the aftermath of a Klingon battle. The film’s main problem is that it grinds to a crushing halt twice. First, unnecessarily, when we are introduced to the Next Generation crew aboard the holodeck with a charmless and baffling walk-the-plank / promotion scene and, secondly, inescapably, when Picard arrives in the Nexus at his bizarrely dressed family. The other grumble is Data’s emotion chip storyline which was certainly a worthwhile idea but all of the scenes where it is played for a laugh or as punctuation fall horribly flat. However, Generations looks fantastic, Shatner and Stewart are great and the story is ambitious, spectacular and thought-provoking (if you want it to be; what would you do to reach utopia?).

This movie contains mild swear words and violence, unpleasant scenes.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

T.J. Hooker 2.01 Second Chance (1982) – 6/10 police action drama TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Rebecca Holden: Lynn Hartmann
Robert Davi: The Barber
Victor Campos:
Al Ruscio:
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Mark Rodgers
Director: Don Weis
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 2.01 Second Chance (1982)

An old unsolved case from Hooker’s past returns to terrorise a local dance teacher.

6/10

The slightly naff start of the second series sees April Clough replaced with even lovelier Heather Locklear and William Shatner replaced rather too often by his stunt ‘double’. However, the stunt work itself is of a high quality as Hooker writes off another squad car ("Well, it did have more than a thousand miles on it.") spectacularly enough to make the title sequence.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains peril.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

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T.J. Hooker 1.04 Hooker’s War (1982, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
April Clough: Officer Victoria Taylor
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Sid Haig:
Vic Tayback: Pete Benedict
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Leo Garen
Director: Charles Picerni
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 1.04 Hooker’s War (1982)

Hooker gets involved with illegal gun-running in the city but relishes the chance to work alongside Pete Benedict, his partner when he was a detective.

6/10

Normally the term clichéd is used in a derogatory sense but this thoroughly entertaining episode elicits cheers of delight when Shatner spits out such beauties as “If you want a war, you can have it”, “…being dead is as much trouble as there is” and other golden oldies. There’s even a detective on his last case.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains unpleasant scene.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

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T.J. Hooker 1.03 God Bless the Child (1982, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
April Clough: Officer Victoria Taylor
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Rick Lenz: Dr. Damon Segal
Tom Nardini: Falco
Steve Sandor: Perez
Ed Bernard: Lieutenant Tom Reed
Paul Kent: Harry Simpson
Susan McClung: Cathy Hooker
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Creator: Rick Husky
Writer: Rick Husky
Director: Harry Falk
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 1.03 God Bless the Child (1982)

The death of a young girl the same age as his oldest daughter causes Hooker to redouble his efforts to get drugs off the streets.

6/10

Hooker adds to his remarkable array of talents by knowing the exact age of a victim just by looking at her (“same age as my daughter”) and he tells us that ‘he wants the guys that did it, Romano; I wan’ ’em real bad’. Huzzah! Though, like all Rick Husky-scripted episodes, it’s inconsistent in between the earnestness, it all quickly builds to a tidy action climax where Hooker threatens to a blow a hole the size of “the Holland Tunnel” in a bad guy, hangs on to a speeding car bonnet and pleads with the crims to resist arrest so he can punch him.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains adult dialogue and violence.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

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T.J. Hooker 1.02 The Streets (1982, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
April Clough: Officer Victoria Taylor
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Karen Carlson: Tracy Hill
George Murdock: Police Detective
Gary Frank: Brett Williams
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Creator: Rick Husky
Writer: Rick Husky
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 1.02 Streets, The (1982)

Hooker gets involved with a serial mugger when he witnesses the culprit leaving the scene of a crime.

5/10

While Hooker’s miraculous expertise here runs to intimate knowledge of a bus route, the criminal and female journalist are both unconvincing and uninteresting. That said, Shatner convinces that he can’t stand the sight of her and he gets a couple of decent chase sequences including one very well filmed run along a high wall and jump onto a bus.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains threatened violence.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

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T.J. Hooker 3.21 Gang War (1984, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: [Officer Vince Romano]
Heather Locklear: [Officer Stacy Sheridan]
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Julie Carmen: Julia Mendez
Tony Plana: Chuy Vallestero
Marco Rodriguez: Julio Fuente
Sal Lopez: Luis Molina
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Sidney Ellis
Director: William Shatner
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.21 Gang War (1984)

Instrumental in getting two rival gangs to come together to talk peace, Hooker has to exert his authority and influence to keep the peace when someone tries to keep the gang war going.

5/10

As with most Shatner directed episodes, this is a bit weak but zips through the running time. This episode sees Hooker solve a gang war via car chases (good) but there is a giant hole in the plot (Maria must have seen her attacker but doesn’t say who it is and not out of fear or loyalty) which sticks out like a sore thumb as soon as it happens. Still, Hooker nearly throws a crim off a roof and tells us he ‘wants them bad,’ which is always good value, and Stacy gets to impotently jump into more scenes after they’ve finished than for a while.

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