Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991) – 8/10 science-fiction action adventure movie review

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Cast / crew
For: Gene Roddenberry
Director and Screenplay Writer: Nicholas Meyer
Kirk: William Shatner
Spock: Leonard Nimoy
DeForest Kelley: McCoy
James Doohan: Scotty
Walter Koenig: Chekov
Nichelle Nichols: Uhuru
George Takei: Sulu
Mark Lenard: Sarek
David Warner: Chancellor Gorkon
Kim Cattrall: Lt. Valeris
Rosana DeSoto: Azetbur
Christopher Plummer: Chang
Dedicated To and Original Series Creator STAR TREK: Gene Roddenberry
Story Writer: Lawrence Konner
Story Writer: Mark Rosenthal
Actor, Executive Producer and Story Writer: Leonard Nimoy
Screenplay Writer: Denny Martin Flinn
Producer: Ralph Winter
Producer: Steven-Charles Jaffe

Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991)

When a disaster on Praxis, an important energy-producing moon, faces the Klingon race with the choice of military expenditure or survival as a species, they call to the Federation to arrange a peace. Three months from retirement, Captain James T. Kirk and the crew of the Enterprise are sent as a figurative olive branch to escort the Klingon Ambassador to Earth. After a less-than-successful diplomatic meal aboard the Enterprise, Kirk is rudely awoken by the sound of Enterprise firing on the Ambassador’s ship and his subsequent assassination. In the absence of the actual killers, Kirk and McCoy are arrested and put on trial.

8/10

"Nice to see you in action, one more time, Captain Kirk." – Captain Sulu

In what must be a unique cinematic event, the original Star Trek cast literally sign off from their motion picture series and must have been deservedly proud that it was done with this spectacular and interesting, generally well paced and smart movie. Boasting social commentary, courtroom drama, murder mystery intrigue, one of the greatest beards in movie history (Kurtwood Smith), a prison escape, a dude who doesn’t have knees where his knees are and a classic space battle resolved with intellect (and a lot of photon torpedoes, admittedly), The Undiscovered Country is a terrific movie with a lot to like. Not included in that list would be Kim Cattrall who threatens to undermine everything with her lack of acting ability. Generally, though, the movie is handled surely by Wrath of Khan director Nicholas Meyer and is headlined by wonderful work from William Shatner and Leonard Nimoy. It certainly was nice to see them in action one more time.

This movie contains graphic violence, gory scenes, unpleasant scenes

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

Star Trek: Generations (1994) – 7/10 science fiction action adventure movie review

Cast / crew
Patrick Stewart: Picard
Jonathan Frakes: Riker
Brent Spiner: Data
LeVar Burton: Geordi
Michael Dorn: Worf
Gates McFadden: Beverly
Marina Sirtis: Troi
Malcolm McDowell: Soran
James Doohan: Scotty
Walter Koenig: Chekov
William Shatner: Captain James T. Kirk
Writer (Original Series’ Creator) Star Trek: Gene Roddenberry
Writer (Story): Rick Berman
Writer (Story): Ronald D. Moore
Writer (Story): Brannon Braga
Writer (Screenplay): Ronald D. Moore
Writer (Screenplay): Brannon Braga
Producer: Rick Berman
Director: David Carson

Star Trek: Generations (1994)

Eighty years after surviving an energy ribbon that claimed the life of Captain Kirk aboard the USS Enterprise B, Soran gets involved with the current Enterprise and her crew when the observatory he is working on is attacked by Romulans.

7/10

The Next Generation‘s first big-screen outing is good but a little unsatisfactory; especially on repeat viewings. First time around, though, this is a spectacular, science-fiction with at least one edge-of-the-seat scene with the aftermath of a Klingon battle. The film’s main problem is that it grinds to a crushing halt twice. First, unnecessarily, when we are introduced to the Next Generation crew aboard the holodeck with a charmless and baffling walk-the-plank / promotion scene and, secondly, inescapably, when Picard arrives in the Nexus at his bizarrely dressed family. The other grumble is Data’s emotion chip storyline which was certainly a worthwhile idea but all of the scenes where it is played for a laugh or as punctuation fall horribly flat. However, Generations looks fantastic, Shatner and Stewart are great and the story is ambitious, spectacular and thought-provoking (if you want it to be; what would you do to reach utopia?).

This movie contains mild swear words and violence, unpleasant scenes.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

T.J. Hooker 2.01 Second Chance (1982) – 6/10 police action drama TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Rebecca Holden: Lynn Hartmann
Robert Davi: The Barber
Victor Campos:
Al Ruscio:
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Mark Rodgers
Director: Don Weis
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 2.01 Second Chance (1982)

An old unsolved case from Hooker’s past returns to terrorise a local dance teacher.

6/10

The slightly naff start of the second series sees April Clough replaced with even lovelier Heather Locklear and William Shatner replaced rather too often by his stunt ‘double’. However, the stunt work itself is of a high quality as Hooker writes off another squad car ("Well, it did have more than a thousand miles on it.") spectacularly enough to make the title sequence.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains peril.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

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T.J. Hooker 1.04 Hooker’s War (1982, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
April Clough: Officer Victoria Taylor
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Sid Haig:
Vic Tayback: Pete Benedict
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Leo Garen
Director: Charles Picerni
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 1.04 Hooker’s War (1982)

Hooker gets involved with illegal gun-running in the city but relishes the chance to work alongside Pete Benedict, his partner when he was a detective.

6/10

Normally the term clichéd is used in a derogatory sense but this thoroughly entertaining episode elicits cheers of delight when Shatner spits out such beauties as “If you want a war, you can have it”, “…being dead is as much trouble as there is” and other golden oldies. There’s even a detective on his last case.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains unpleasant scene.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

Links

T.J. Hooker 1.03 God Bless the Child (1982, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
April Clough: Officer Victoria Taylor
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Rick Lenz: Dr. Damon Segal
Tom Nardini: Falco
Steve Sandor: Perez
Ed Bernard: Lieutenant Tom Reed
Paul Kent: Harry Simpson
Susan McClung: Cathy Hooker
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Creator: Rick Husky
Writer: Rick Husky
Director: Harry Falk
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 1.03 God Bless the Child (1982)

The death of a young girl the same age as his oldest daughter causes Hooker to redouble his efforts to get drugs off the streets.

6/10

Hooker adds to his remarkable array of talents by knowing the exact age of a victim just by looking at her (“same age as my daughter”) and he tells us that ‘he wants the guys that did it, Romano; I wan’ ’em real bad’. Huzzah! Though, like all Rick Husky-scripted episodes, it’s inconsistent in between the earnestness, it all quickly builds to a tidy action climax where Hooker threatens to a blow a hole the size of “the Holland Tunnel” in a bad guy, hangs on to a speeding car bonnet and pleads with the crims to resist arrest so he can punch him.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains adult dialogue and violence.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

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T.J. Hooker 1.02 The Streets (1982, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
April Clough: Officer Victoria Taylor
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Karen Carlson: Tracy Hill
George Murdock: Police Detective
Gary Frank: Brett Williams
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Creator: Rick Husky
Writer: Rick Husky
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 1.02 Streets, The (1982)

Hooker gets involved with a serial mugger when he witnesses the culprit leaving the scene of a crime.

5/10

While Hooker’s miraculous expertise here runs to intimate knowledge of a bus route, the criminal and female journalist are both unconvincing and uninteresting. That said, Shatner convinces that he can’t stand the sight of her and he gets a couple of decent chase sequences including one very well filmed run along a high wall and jump onto a bus.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains threatened violence.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.21 Gang War (1984, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: [Officer Vince Romano]
Heather Locklear: [Officer Stacy Sheridan]
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Julie Carmen: Julia Mendez
Tony Plana: Chuy Vallestero
Marco Rodriguez: Julio Fuente
Sal Lopez: Luis Molina
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Sidney Ellis
Director: William Shatner
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.21 Gang War (1984)

Instrumental in getting two rival gangs to come together to talk peace, Hooker has to exert his authority and influence to keep the peace when someone tries to keep the gang war going.

5/10

As with most Shatner directed episodes, this is a bit weak but zips through the running time. This episode sees Hooker solve a gang war via car chases (good) but there is a giant hole in the plot (Maria must have seen her attacker but doesn’t say who it is and not out of fear or loyalty) which sticks out like a sore thumb as soon as it happens. Still, Hooker nearly throws a crim off a roof and tells us he ‘wants them bad,’ which is always good value, and Stacy gets to impotently jump into more scenes after they’ve finished than for a while.

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T.J. Hooker 3.22 Deadlock (1984, Police Action Drama) – 8/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Dennis Lipscomb: Rawlins
Mike Gomez: Gomez
Clarence Williams III: Martin
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Bruce Shelly
Writer: David Ketchum
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.22 Deadlock (1984)

Hooker and Romano get trapped in a department store by a gang of ruthless robbers and their situation goes from bad to worse when Romano is badly injured and Hooker gets trapped in an elevator with the ringleader.

8/10

No car chases and just a single location but this is one of the best episodes as Hooker and Romano get trapped by three ruthless robbers in a department store. Hooker gets through another squad car which is, hilariously, SPOILER pinched by a couple of young vandals. The episode generates an impressive level of peril as Romano looks to be in serious trouble though Hooker does reassure the audience by calling the lead robber maggot. Hooker also gets trapped in an elevator with him and an empty gun and there’s no cheating to resolve things. Hooker hilariously (deliberately so) SPOILER fakes a nerve gas attack while SPOILER Richard Herd randomly turns up and blows one of the other robbers away. A classic.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, gory and unpleasant scenes.

Links

T.J. Hooker 1.01 The Protectors (1982, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Richard Lawson: McNeil
Adrian Zmed: Vince Romano
Brian Patrick Clarke: Canfield
John Gladstein: Granger
Kelly Harmon:
Jo McDonnell:
Deborah Shelton: Lacy Canfield
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Rick Husky
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 1.01 Protectors, The (1982)

Demoted to sergeant after his partner was killed, policeman T.J. Hooker is assigned to run a scheme training new recruits as quickly as possible and getting them into on the job training.

5/10

Surprisingly subdued pilot movie (it’s clearly aiming to be more gritty than the show turned out) but one wishes that there was more of The Shat being a hero in it. His Dirty Harry stuff at the burger stand and a hilarious finger-wagging in his opening speech is all we get but at least we would have several series of a classic cop show to make up for it.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, unpleasant scenes.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.20 Psychic Terror (1984, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Marcy Lafferty: Julia Hudson
Paul Kent: Lt. Barton
Bruce Glover: Tony Aresco
Buck Taylor: Sam Rand
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: William Kelley
Director: Kenneth R. Koch
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.20 Psychic Terror (1984)

When a psychic is brought in to help with a child kidnapping, Hooker is rather more than sceptical despite her previous successes. She requests his assistance but doesn’t tell him why: she has foreseen his death…

5/10

Hooker spectacularly gets through another squad car which is always fun and, despite a psychic consultant storyline which is unconvincing at best, this is a solid episode which zips through the running time. Shatner’s wife Marcy Lafferty is the psychic in her second of four guest starring appearances on the show (as different characters). The climax borrows the telephone-to-telephone sequence from Dirty Harry.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.19 Death Strip (1984, Police Action Drama) – 4/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Thom Christopher: Paul Gavin
Nicholas Campbell: Toby Clark
Thalmus Rasulala: Lt. Craig Arkin
Joey Aresco: Sid Beamer
Sam Anderson: Leo Santee
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Patrick Mathews
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.19 Death Strip (1984)

As yet another narcotics bust goes wrong, this time with an informant getting killed, Hooker and his "brass band" go after the murderer, a man who wants to become a major player in drug trafficking and will stop at nothing.

4/10

Below par Hooker which reaches its lowest point when a stuntperson’s brown wig falls off during a stunt to expose long, flowing blond locks! Romano also gets in on the random skill reveal when, aside from being a stripper (which he does great until his trousers come off), he starts talking in sign language. Not be outdone, of course, Hooker starts talking in sign language later as well.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.18 Death on the Line (1984, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Kimberly Beck: Linda Stevens
Lynne Moody: Dr. Pamela Carter
John Dennis Johnston: Cliff Tanner
Jonathan Perpich: Dan Stevens
James Whitmore, Jr.: Frank Bryce
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.18 Death on the Line (1984)

When a robber and a rapist team up, it confuses the trail left for Hooker and co. but he soon sniffs the truth.

6/10

Solid episode which handles the serious topic of rape with due seriousness and balance but it’s all a little bit flat. This is probably due to the almost complete lack of pumping music during the action sequences. It also comes as something of a surprise when they don’t get Stacy into her underwear to pose as bait for the rapist. The final chase is well done, though, with the rapist running out of bullets correctly, then punching Hooker after being tackled (the traditional end of the chase). Hooker doesn’t seem too perturbed by this uncommon event, however, and throws him over the side of a pier into the sea and nearly bursts out laughing.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.17 Hot Property (1984, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Ray Wise: Harrison MacKenzie
Jason Evers:
Anne Lockhart:
Ed Bernard: Lieutenant Tom Reed
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Chester Krumholz
Director: Ric Rondell

T.J. Hooker 3.17 Hot Property (1984)

When a policeman is discovered dead at a drug bust, it seems that he may have been on the take but the supplier is successfully deflecting the efforts of honest cops to nail him (including getting Stacy suspended). Meanwhile, an ex-fiancee of Stacy’s returns to her life and this is not a coincidence.

6/10

Fun, though Hooker hilariously breaks the case by identifying a spent match! There’s a generous amount of good well-filmed stunt work and there are probably more bullets fired in this episode than the rest of the season put together. There’s even a bullet fired by Stacy. Just the one, mind you, despite her using an assault rifle. She also gets an expanded role without having to take her clothes off! Best stunt is probably two dudes jumping out of the way of a speeding car (it looks really close and the double personnel makes it extra dangerous) and most fun stunts are the climax when Hooker throws the baddie through what seems to be every wall in a warehouse ending up in a elevator shaft (Hooker: "Alright maggot, let’s go. We’re on the wrong floor.").

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.13 Too Late for Love (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Barbara Stock: Amy Robbins
Thom Christopher: Harry Cort
Theresa Saldana: Maria Santini
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Director: Michael Preece
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 2.13 Too Late for Love (1983)

When a series of fur coat robberies takes place, Romano is delighted to have a chance to reacquaint himself with his beautiful clothes model ex-girlfriend, Amy, but her appearance at the same location as the robberies is not a coincidence.

6/10

An improvement on writer Jack V. Fogarty’s previous additions to the series, this is solid entertainment and features a terrific scene where Romano punches Hooker (that’s after eulogising him earlier to a date and, to be fair, he is instantly mortified). There’s also some good action with very tidy stuntworrk in the opening chase, a more thoughtful than usual shootout mid-way and an impressive solo beat down by Romano for the climax.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence and a long look at stacy’s bum.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.12 The Fast Lane (1982, Police Action Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: [Officer Vince Romano]
Heather Locklear: [Officer Stacy Sheridan]
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Rosemary Forsyth: Irene King
Ike Eisenmann: Matt King
Stefan Arngrim: Luke
Dana Kimmell: Susan Folsen
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Jeffrey Hayes
Director: Don Chaffey
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 2.12 Fast Lane, The (1982)

Hooker goes up against the evils of teenage alcoholism but it comes closer to Romano than they would expect.

7/10

This episode touches a convincing nerve as a parent has no idea that her teenage son has been fired from his job, is an alcoholic and is partaking in criminal activity from selling booze to minors to armed robbery. You often see people blaming the parents for this, that and the other but the truth is it is common for them to be the last to know. The remainder of the episode contains the elements you come to expect with convenient plotting, cheesy dialogue and unconvincing camaraderie but there’s a great moment when Romano stops Hooker shooting at a crim (Shatner’s furious reaction face is awesome), the climactic stunt is good (it’s a combination stunt where Hooker jumps off a truck before it overturns, all in one shot) and, as highlighted before, the stories’ core resonates strongly.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains unpleasant scenes, violence.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.16 Hooker’s Run (1984, Police Action Drama) – 4/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: [Officer Vince Romano]
Heather Locklear: [Officer Stacy Sheridan]
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Shanna Reed: [Angie Quine]
Kaleena Kiff: [Mary Quine]
Alex Rocco: [Frank Dio]
Tom Atkins: [Phil Parker]
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Co-Producer: Simon Muntner
Writer: Simon Muntner
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.16 Hooker’s Run (1984)

A murderer’s former girlfriend could send him to prison with her testimony, but her death has been ordered and there is a leak in the department. Hooker knows he can trust Vince, Stacy and Jim but everyone else, including ex-army buddy and Detective in Charge Phil Parker, must be under suspicion.

4/10

Badly plotted and unenthusiastically, though pacily, directed. Asking James Darren to do more acting is always a bad idea as he consistently comes across as creepy, inappropriate or unconvincing. Brilliantly, he even suggests that another character get “personality lessons.” Still, his role moves aside after a while and the action is pretty tidy. There’s a good staircase chase and rooftop battle, a very good high fall, Hooker gets through another squad car and there’s an A-Team-inspired climax.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.15 Exercise in Murder (1984, Police Action Drama) – 8/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Judson Scott: Bobby Curtis
Tracy Scoggins: Jill Newmark
Robert Davi: Tom Warfield
James O’Sullivan: Internal Affairs
Greg Morris: Dave Reemer
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Co-Producer: Jack V. Fogarty
Co-Producer: Simon Muntner
Writer (Screenplay): Jack V. Fogarty
Writer (Screenplay): Simon Muntner
Writer (Story): Ed Waters
Director: Phil Bondelli
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.15 Exercise in Murder (1984)

Corrigan’s magically appearing girlfriend of “three or four months” (!), Jill, is inextricably involved with a gang pulling off armed jewel robberies while Hooker has to come to terms with shooting a small child.

8/10

This is classic Hooker with all the boxes ticked. The main crime plot is fine, there’s a car chase, both Hooker and Corrigan get personal stakes in the plot and an expanded role for Stacey means dancing in a leotard and a shower scene. The makers pull off a great scene early on when Hooker shoots a small child (or the technical term, as Internal Affairs later puts it, “blowing away the little sucker”). The scene is delivered without fanfare or build-up and just as any other part of the typical Hooker action sequence. They even have the kid go flying backwards into something just like if it was a bad guy. It was the perfect way to do it. I was eating cereal and it stopped me mid-munch in a did-they-just-do-that moment.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains adult dialogue and violence and sexuality.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.14 The Snow Game (1984, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Gary Lockwood:
Pepe Serna:
Jay Varela:
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Fred J. McKnight
Director: William Shatner
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.14 Snow Game, The (1984)

When a drug bust goes fatally wrong, then Romano gets shot, Hooker, Stacy and Corrigan go undercover to bring the perpetrators and their employers down.

5/10

Po-faced episode where everyone except Hooker is unconvincingly devastated (especially Corrigan, goodness he’s bad) after a fellow cop is assassinated. For a Shatner-directed episode, though, this is quite good. Unlike James Darren and Adrian Zmed, the man himself manages to pull off the determination and emotion required by the episode. The script isn’t terribly broken and he stages some good action sequences which have pace, shape and environmental interest. For instance, there is very good use of a helicopter in the opening action – especially for the sequence’s action punchline – while the bad guy gets a spectacular exit off a ship.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.13 The Lipstick Killer (1984, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
David Huffman: Dr. Don Travers
Katherine Justice: Joan Wagner
Hugh Farrington: Martin
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: David Ketchum
Writer: Robert Dennis
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Writer: Ed Waters
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.13 Lipstick Killer, The (1984)

When a nurse is bludgeoned to death with a blunt instrument it rings a bell from Hooker’s detective past. Assigned to assist, he soon discovers that it is a psychotic nurse who always kills one victim within 48 hours of the previous. It becomes a race against time as Hooker tries to close in on the killer that evaded him five years before.

5/10

Clearly inspired by Hitchcock (specifically Psycho and Vertigo) this is a humorously cheesy episode with a cringe-worthy story but strong action sequences. Hooker gets through another police car with a tidy car chase and agreeably huge explosion; later he performs a sweet dive and roll out of the way of a Porsche and that chase also sees the Porsche go spectacularly off the top of a multi-storey car park. The problem comes from the villain clearly being a dude from the outset (the story would have been better if the crimes hadn’t been shown) and villains in drag are not generally convincing in screen entertainment. The other problem is the horribly unconvincing and creepy ‘camaraderie’ of Corrigan towards Stacy which, of course, would only get more unconvincing and creepier. Gah!

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.11 The Connection (1982, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Terri Nunn: Sue Anne
Claude Earl Jones: Tootie Nelson
Richard Lineback: Kenny
James Daughton: Tom Clemons
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Donald R. Boyle
Director: Corey Allen
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 2.11 Connection, The (1982)

When a young girl tries to fly off the top of her local high school and an trainee undercover is left fighting for his life after a narcotics bust goes wrong, Hooker vows to find the PCP distributor and put him away.

5/10

Despite the seriousness of school children taking drugs, this is still a very silly episode. That said, a fist fight in the back of a car while involved in a car chase scores good points and Romano gets a full strop on which is always good for a giggle. Additionally, for South Park fans, we get a scene where a woman screams "they’re gonna kill Kenny." Oh, and add undercover narcotics cop, sign language and the ability to shoot two adjacent holes with one bullet to Hooker’s never-ending list of skills.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains substance abuse and violence.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

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T.J. Hooker 2.10 Thieves’ Highway (1982, Police Action Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Guy Stockwell: Zechariah “Zach” Pappas
Laraine Stephens: Mary Pappas
Taylor Lacher:
Karrie Emerson:
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Writer: Roger Lewis
Writer: Devorah Cutler
Director: Michael Preece
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg
C.J.: Venus

T.J. Hooker 2.10 Thieves’ Highway (1982)

When independent trucker Zack Pappas gets shot as he tries to run over a local businessman, Hooker knows that something is up and is not surprised when Pappas tells him that the businessman is trying to wipe out all independent truckers and is willing to resort to murderous means if necessary.

7/10

Better than the previous few episodes, this is cheery, cheesy and simplistic fun with a nice big explosion and some wonderfully righteous Hooker posturing and leaping onto bad guys and leaping onto lorries and a battle of hair-spray with a new police commissioner. Add in plenty of synthesised funk beats, Romano in a creepy romance (not with Venus) and an impressively daft blind-drawing sequence to identify a hitman and you start to think that this is something of a classic episode. Not good, exactly, but classic. Oh, and it stars an orang-utan which automatically rules, especially when he’s in the back of Hooker’s car during a chase looking askance at our hero.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence and mild sensuality.

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.12 Slay Ride (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Robert Dryer: Troy Eldridge
Philece Sampler: Sue Ann Eldridge
John McLiam: Father DeMarco
Marjoe Gortner: Marino
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Rick Husky
Director: Bruce Kessler
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.12 Slay Ride (1983)

While Hooker and Stacy are suffering from Christmas blues thanks to the prospect of spending the holiday period alone, they get involved in the case of a couple of armed robbers and their baby who they decide to abandon in a church.

6/10

Despite a very strong start featuring Hooker as Santa Claus executing a narcotics bust (arrest punchline: "Merry Christmas, punk!"), the story side of things gets progressively worse and even the car chases are rather underplayed. Refreshingly, Heather Locklear gets a storyline that doesn’t involve bikinis and impotently jumping into shot after an action scene finishes, Shatner gets a nice scene on the phone to his daughter, and there is still entertainment value to be had in the lead characters as they thoughtfully consider each other’s needs at Christmas time.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.11 Undercover Affair (1983, Police Action Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Barry Primus: Martin Colson
Simone Griffeth: Paige Miller
Richard Herd: Captain Dennis Sheridan
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Simon Muntner
Director: Charles Picerni
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.11 Undercover Affair (1983)

Hooker interferes with a FBI operation to take down a major drug supplier when people he knows on the street start getting hurt. Then he discovers that an old lover, Paige Miller, is deep undercover as the suppliers’ girlfriend and that is something he really doesn’t like.

7/10

Classic episode in which you are not supposed to notice that Hooker is clearly in the wrong for almost the entire time as he refuses to see the larger picture in the case of an international drug dealer. Good action, great scenery chewing from Shatner and a director who doesn’t underestimate the scenic value of bikini-clad babes in this series.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, unpleasasnt scenes.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.10 Blue Murder (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Grant Goodeve:
Jeana Tomasina: Gloria
Paul Burke:
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Paul B. Margolis
Director: Don Chaffey
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.10 Blue Murder (1983)

When a scumlord escapes punishment yet again, two cops decide to take things into their own hands and execute him. What will Hooker do when he discovers the truth?

6/10

This is still thoroughly entertaining but the plot is identical to SPOILER Clint Eastwood’s Dirty Harry sequel Magnum Force and it suffers in comparison. Special mention for the drug dealer’s fantastic car.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.08 Matter of Passion (1983, Police Action Drama) – 6/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
John Vernon: Grant Chandler
Kristen Meadows:
Marc Alaimo: Ray Downing
Robert O’Reilly: Jack Riker
Lloyd Haynes: Lew Jensen
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Dick Nelson
Director: Sigmund Neufeld, Jr.
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.09 Matter of Passion (1983)

When Hooker discovers the dead body of a beautiful young woman on the beach he determines to exact justice despite being unable to identify her.

6/10

It’s a bit more variable than most episodes with several strong sequences where things are taken far more slowly than is usual for the show. A dead girl’s hand grasping Hooker’s arm makes an impression as does quietly looking around her apartment when they eventually find it. However, the romantic angle is half-hearted (though bikini-heavy) and there are two notably naff sequences where the bad guys attempt to assassinate Hooker (the car bomb even uses recycled footage from an earlier episode, badly). As a bonus, Romano does manage to wear the worst funeral suit in television history.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, mild unpleasant scenes.

Links

T.J. Hooker S03E08 The Trial (1983) – 5/10 Police Action Courtroom Drama TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Lenore Kasdorf: Gina Canelli
Jeff Pomerantz: Briggs
Lee de Broux: Frank Abbott
Charles Dierkop: Doud
James Hong: Mr. Hong
Robert Hooks: Lt. Ellis
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Stephen Downing
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker S03E08 Trial, The (1983)

When Romano gets shot (again), he blames Gina Canelli, a young female officer who he and Canelli’s partner claim could have shot the suspect. Hooker agrees to defend Canelli at the trial much to Romano’s chagrin.

5/10

This is not a well-written episode as most things happen unconvincingly but necessarily for the plot to continue. Therefore, we have Hooker acting as a lawyer in a police tribunal and most of the dialogue and plot therein appears to have been written by somebody who watches Hollywood television trials as opposed to someone who is aware of the law. A couple of minutes after Hooker prevents a previous incident being brought up against his client, he brings up a previous incident against a witness, breaking him. The episode is well-paced and interesting, however, as there is friction between Hooker and Romano and, while there’s not enough time to squeeze in a full-size car chase, a baddie does drive around a corner and into a florists, and that’ll have to do.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence, mild gory and unpleasant scenes.

Links

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T.J. Hooker 3.07 A Child is Missing (1983, Police Action Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano]
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan]
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Henry Darrow: Miguel Gomez
Steven Keats: David Burke
Barbara Horan: Paula Bennett
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Jack B. Sowards
Director: Cliff Bole
Executive Producer: Aaron Spelling
Executive Producer: Leonard Goldberg

T.J. Hooker 3.07 Child is Missing, A (1983)

Hooker follows a child kidnapper all the way to Mexico.

5/10

This episode is a little let down by an unusually flat William Shatner and the unconvincing Hooker-strides-into-Mehico storyline. But we still get two car chases, several lovely ladies, Hooker thrown down a flight of stairs and an interesting climax that sees Hooker look like a thug because he isn’t wearing his uniform but is still behaving as though he is. As I was watching this episode, I kept thinking to myself how reminiscent the music was of Robert Zemeckis’ 1984 action hit Romancing the Stone. As it turns out, this episode was scored by Alan Silvestri, the composer on Romancing the Stone, exploring the Mexican rhythms he would employ the following year.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.09 A Cry for Help (1982, Police Action Drama) – 4/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: [Officer Vince Romano]
Heather Locklear: [Officer Stacy Sheridan]
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Henry Darrow:
Panchito Gomez: Danny Perez
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Creator: Rick Husky
Writer: Jack V. Fogarty
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 2.09 Cry for Help, A (1982)

When a juvenile gang member is set up to take the blame for the murder of a drug supplier, Hooker gets personally involved.

4/10

Seriously cheesy episode as Hooker arranges an ear operation! Director Cliff Bole keeps the pace up and also delivers a nice stunt sequence with Hooker on a plane wing and dodging propellers (it’s also used in the title sequence).

This T.J. Hooker episode contains violence, unpleasant scenes.

Classified 12 by BBFC. Suitable only for persons of 12 years and over.

Links

T.J. Hooker 2.08 Deadly Ambition (1982, Police Drama) – 5/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
Richard Herd: Captain Sheridan
Cliff Potts: Detective Holland
Jonathan Goldsmith: Cody Mayfield
Jesse Vint: Ben Edwards
Royce D. Applegate: Frank Durbin
Deborah Foreman: Elise
Jerry Lee Lewis:
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Arthur Weingarten
Director: Michael Preece

T.J. Hooker 2.08 Deadly Ambition (1982)

Hooker comes up against the results of over-ambition in the police force.

5/10

This is a weaker episode with a story that could have been more interesting if Cliff Potts’ ambitious cop hadn’t been portrayed as such an arrogant slime-ball. If both he and Hooker had been portrayed as doing the right thing, most scenes would have been more thought-provoking and the show could definitely handle that. However, there’s also no car chases or much action of any kind which is a bit more noticeable and marks this out as mid-season filler. Special Guest Star Jerry Lee Lewis bizarrely turns up but at least that gives us an excuse to marvel at a couple of scenes where he plays a piano faster than television cameras can record.

This T.J. Hooker episode contains gun violence.

 

Classified PG by BBFC. Parental Guidance.

Links

T.J. Hooker 3.06 Walk a Straight Line (1983, Police Alcoholism Action Drama) – 7/10 TV review

Cast / crew
William Shatner: T.J. Hooker
Adrian Zmed: Officer Vince Romano
Heather Locklear: Officer Stacy Sheridan
James Darren: Jim Corrigan
Writer (Series’ Creator): Rick Husky
Vincent Baggetta: Sam Dietrich
Belinda J. Montgomery: Laura Dietrich
Ron Joseph: Lester Sayles
Mitch Carter:
Supervising Producer: Rick Husky
Producer: Jeffrey Hayes
Writer: Rick Kelbaugh
Director: Cliff Bole

T.J. Hooker 3.06 Walk a Straight Line (1983)

When a stakeout goes terribly wrong, Corrigan suspects that one of the detectives involved has a drink problem. The detective is one of Hooker’s ex-partners and he agrees to have a word with him but more action may need to be taken. Meanwhile, the Jumpsuit gang are pulling off more and more dangerous armed robberies.

7/10

This is a good Hooker episode which bolts the dancing girls, car chases and ‘splosions onto a well-handled backbone tackling alcoholism. Hooker managed to get himself out of trouble after the break-up of his marriage so he is in a good position to help his friend. As is the case, the friend denies there is a problem and doesn’t respond to words. It often takes a brush with mortality to push an alcoholic into remedial action and the episode does a good job of portraying this arc and keeping it serious while still keeping the awesomeness of the remainder of the show. The chase sequences are good with quality punchlines. The first ends with a huge explosion and the second with Hooker leaping through the air and tipping himself and the baddie through a barrier into the sea. Cue classic moment when the bad guy sputters that he can’t swim. So Hooker retorts “Let me help you” and punches him in the noggin. The last chase has Hooker leaping on to the back of a speeding van. Hurrah!

This T.J. Hooker episode contains unpleasant scenes, mild violence.

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